RE­COV­ERY: US­ING AN EX­HAUST JACK

EX­HAUST JACKS CAN BE A SE­RI­OUS TOOL IN YOUR RE­COV­ERY ARSE­NAL.

4 x 4 Australia - - Contents - WORDS AND PHO­TOS DANIEL EVERETT

WHEN you’re in the bush, things go wrong – it’s es­sen­tially the rea­son why we’re run­ning this re­cov­ery se­ries. And one of the most dan­ger­ous things you’ll ever come across is the sim­ple act of lift­ing your four-wheel drive off the ground. In the­ory it’s a sim­ple ex­er­cise and, in a road-go­ing ve­hi­cle, re­quires such lit­tle brain ca­pac­ity it could be mea­sured in tea­spoons. But when you’re deal­ing with lifted 4x4s, things get a lit­tle more com­pli­cated.

4x4s by their very na­ture are higher than most other ve­hi­cles, and when you start adding sus­pen­sion lifts and larger tyres they soon reach heights that no bot­tle jack could ever hope to reach.

When you do get them off the ground they’re so un­sta­ble a stray breeze could see them come crash­ing down – not good news for any un­sus­pect­ing legs that hap­pen to be un­der­neath. En­ter the ex­haust jack.

Ex­haust jacks are de­signed as a sim­ple and safe re­place­ment for the trusty high­lift jack, a means to get your 4x4 off the ground with­out the risk of break­ing your jaw with a way­ward jack han­dle. An­other plus is that an ex­haust jack has a much larger, stur­dier base.

The jacks can get you out of sand or mud in a re­cov­ery sit­u­a­tion, or lift a flat tyre off the ground. Plus they’re touted as be­ing one of the sim­plest bits of re­cov­ery gear money can buy.

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