Con­sult GP on as­pirin re­duc­tion warns doc­tor

Alpine Observer - - News -

BY TATE SPI­TERI

BRIGHT doc­tor Paul Duff has urged peo­ple that take as­pirin reg­u­larly to con­sult their doc­tor be­fore they de­cide to stop tak­ing the med­i­ca­tion.

Dr Duff’s mes­sage comes following a new ASPREE Study pub­lished to­day by the New Eng­land Jour­nal of Medicine that showed healthy peo­ple over 70 that take as­pirin would re­ceive no ben­e­fit.

“As­pirin is still very im­por­tant for peo­ple who have had a pre­vi­ous stroke, ex­ist­ing heart dis­ease or have had heart surgery,” Dr Duff said.

“This story is go­ing to hit the news tonight and all these peo­ple are go­ing to go off as­pirin and (they could) have heart at­tacks.”

Dr Duff said the find­ings that were un­der­taken by one of the most pres­ti­gious med­i­cal stud­ies in the world, clearly stated the im­por­tance as­pirin still had too some pa­tients.

How­ever, Dr Duff fears na­tion­wide me­dia cov­er­age could see peo­ple ne­glect these facts.

“All these peo­ple on as­pirin are go­ing to be con­fused and they are go­ing to say they saw it causes haem­or­rhages and things like that,” he said.

“This study only ap­plies to healthy peo­ple that have got noth­ing wrong with them.”

Dr Duff said GPs and pa­tients in Bright and also Myrtle­ford were all part of the study that started in 2010.

“The study showed as­pirin doesn’t pro­long life, it doesn’t re­duce your risk of ma­jor stroke and that it ac­tu­ally in­creases your risk of se­ri­ous haem­or­rhage but that only ap­plies to peo­ple that are healthy,” he said.

“I hope peo­ple will con­sult their doc­tors be­fore de­cid­ing to just stop tak­ing as­pirin.”

MES­SAGE: Bright doc­tor Paul Duff thinks peo­ple will stop tak­ing as­pirin following the re­lease of a new study on the med­i­ca­tion.

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