HER­ITAGE AND HIS­TORY

From grand man­sions to graves, gaols and ghosts, Tas­ma­nia’s past is full of amaz­ing sto­ries the whole fam­ily will en­joy.

Amazing Tasmania - - CONTENTS -

Tas­ma­nia’s past is full of amaz­ing sto­ries.

1 STEP BACK IN TIME

greater­ho­bart­trails.com.au

Catch a glimpse of his­toric Tas­ma­nia via the Her­itage High­way. Built on the sweat of labour­ing con­victs in the early 1800s, the high­way fol­lows much of the orig­i­nal route be­tween Ho­bart and Launce­s­ton. An easy day trip by car, there’s time to stop in the Derwent Val­ley and ex­plore some of the well-marked trails and get a glimpse of the less-de­vel­oped side of the is­land.

2 FROM TAS­MA­NIA TO ANTARC­TICA

Queens Do­main, Ho­bart rtbg.tas.gov.au

(03) 6166 0451

Feel a shiver as you visit the sub­antarc­tic plant house nur­tur­ing ex­otic species from Mac­quarie Is­land, the World Her­itage-listed is­land close to Antarc­tica, in the Royal Tas­ma­nian Botan­i­cal Gar­dens. Es­tab­lished al­most 200 years ago, wan­der through 13.5 hectares of fas­ci­nat­ing and di­verse flora.

3 FROM SOL­DIERS TO SO­CI­ETY

Evan­dale Tourist In­for­ma­tion Cen­tre 18 High Street, Evan­dale (03) 6391 8128, evan­dale­tas­ma­nia.com From hum­ble be­gin­nings as a small mil­i­tary post in the early 1800s, Evan­dale is now a Na­tional Trust-clas­si­fied Ge­or­gian vil­lage with some of the most pris­tine ex­am­ples of churches and grand man­sions from that era. Just 20km south of Launce­s­ton, the town was the home of artist John Glover and John Kelly, the fa­ther of famed bushranger Ned Kelly.

4 BLIGH’S BRUNY

brun­y­is­land.org.au

Just an hour’s drive from Ho­bart, in­clud­ing a 15-minute ferry ride from Ket­ter­ing, Bruny Is­land is not to be missed – es­pe­cially for those par­tial to good food and wine. The is­land was first sighted by Abel Tas­man in the 1640s, but it wasn’t un­til the 18th cen­tury that James Cook and Wil­liam Bligh set foot on the is­land. Don’t miss the Bligh Mu­seum of Pa­cific Ex­plo­ration with its trea­sures from the time of early Euro­pean ex­plo­ration. Stun­ning beaches, rov­ing wildlife, and a wide range of ac­com­mo­da­tion (from the Cap­tain James Cook Me­mo­rial Car­a­van Park to the up­scale 43 De­grees eco lodges) make it a fun overnight ad­ven­ture, too.

5 GHOSTLY VI­SIONS

rich­mondvil­lage.com.au

Ge­orge Grover was a bru­tal con­vict over­seer who came to an un­timely end in the 1830s. Some say he may even have been pushed off one of the bridges built by his mis­treated con­victs. His ghost is said to haunt the oth­er­wise pretty and peace­ful vil­lage of Rich­mond. But he’s not alone – other spec­tral vi­sions in­clude a large black and white dog, some­times called Grover’s Dog, as well as a man in a straw hat. Ghostly in­hab­i­tants are also said to in­habit Aus­tralia’s old­est in­tact prison, Rich­mond Gaol, which of­fers a highly at­mo­spheric glimpse of life in a 19th cen­tury prison.

Royal Tas­ma­nian Botan­i­cal Gar­dens Rich­mond Gaol

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