EX­PE­RI­ENCE T HE ISL ANDS OF JO­HOR

March to Oc­to­ber

Asian Geographic - - Front Page -

yield a chance en­counter with these gi­ant fish: Bump­heads weave a trans­par­ent co­coon be­fore they sleep to keep their scent from preda­tors, and this noc­tur­nal sight is as im­pres­sive as that in the day­time.

Bat­fish, Moor­ish idols, hawk­fish, groupers and co­ral trout are other com­mon in­hab­i­tants, as are the res­i­dent whitetip reef sharks and grey reef sharks. Leaff­ish and the odd-look­ing crocodile­fish might also be spot­ted. Corals crowd the reef in a riot of colour: Large black corals and bar­rel sponges vie for at­ten­tion with gi­gan­tic soft tree corals, as well as anemones and their play­ful clown­fish.

The Is­lands of Jo­hor The south­ern state of Jo­hor is blessed with beau­ti­ful is­lands lo­cated far from the main­land. Pu­lau Aur boasts pristine deep wa­ters teem­ing with pelagic fish, while Pu­lau Lang of­fers sight­ings of green tur­tles, bump­head par­rot­fish and blue-spot­ted st­ingrays, a com­mon in­hab­i­tant of the Malaysian coast. The corals in this area shel­ter a colour­ful va­ri­ety of reef fish, cephalopods and crus­taceans, as well as the beau­ti­ful but elu­sive Span­ish dancer nudi­branch.

Ad­ven­tur­ous vis­i­tors will want to seek out the Zero wreck lo­cated south of Aur. Thickly en­crusted with corals, this sunken Ja­panese fighter plane is home to teem­ing ma­rine life like the com­i­cal dog­face puffer­fish, which prefers to swim solo and at­tracts plenty of at­ten­tion for its elon­gated face and box-like body.

WHEN WHERE HOW

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.