Sawmill num­bers dras­ti­cally re­duced since 2000

Australian Forests and Timber - - In The News -

Since 1999–2000 the num­ber of hard­wood sawmills has de­creased by 79%, from 862 mills in 1999–2000 to 182 mills in 2015–16.

The num­ber of soft­wood and cy­press sawmills has de­creased by 72% over the same pe­riod, from 279 mills in 1999–2000 to 77 mills in 2015–16.

Soft­wood sawmills in 2015–16 were larger on av­er­age than they were in 1999– 2000—one-third of soft­wood sawmills had a log in­put ca­pac­ity greater than 100,000 cu­bic me­tres a year in 2015–16.

In con­trast, 96% of hard­wood sawmills had a log in­put ca­pac­ity of less than 45,000 cu­bic me­tres a year in 2015–16.

In 2015–16 soft­wood sawmills pro­duced an es­ti­mated 4.4 mil­lion cu­bic me­tres of sawn­wood. Hard­wood sawmills pro­duced an es­ti­mated 675,000 cu­bic me­tres of sawn­wood.

Hard­wood sawmills pre­dom­i­nantly use logs from pub­lic na­tive forests. Smaller hard­wood sawmills take a much larger pro­por­tion of their logs from pri­vate na­tive forests than do larger hard­wood sawmills.

Soft­wood sawmills (ex­clud­ing cy­press mills) source al­most all their logs from plan­ta­tion forests.

Cy­press mills (which op­er­ate only in New South Wales and Queens­land) source al­most all their logs from pub­lic na­tive forests.

Other mills pro­duce posts and poles, wood-based pan­els, pulp and pa­per, and ex­port logs and wood­chips. Source: ABARES. Aus­tralia’s forests at a glance 2017.

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