Lu­cas Radebe

The Leeds leg­end and orig­i­nal Kaizer Chief names a se­lec­tion of the best he played with and against in the Premier League’s golden era

Australian Four Four Two - - PERFORMANCE -

GK

RB

CB

CB

NIGEL MAR­TYN

Nige was a proper goal­keeper, with fine po­si­tion­ing, dis­tri­bu­tion and aware­ness. Away from the foot­ball pitch, he was hum­ble, a true gen­tle­men and was al­ways will­ing to learn and to teach.

GARY NEVILLE

Gary had an im­pres­sive en­gine, get­ting up and down the flank with ease due to his stamina, and a great mind for de­fend­ing: he knew in­stinc­tively when to make a run and when to cover back.

SOL CAMP­BELL

He was strong, vo­cal, a good or­gan­iser and renowned for his strength in the air, and his im­pres­sive physique made him one of the best. He pro­longed his play­ing ca­reer by tak­ing good care of his body.

JOHN TERRY

I once swapped shirts with him. He was a very con­fi­dent young­ster then, who never backed down from a chal­lenge. He used his vi­sion to close down space and his an­tic­i­pa­tion re­mains stel­lar.

LB

DM

GRAEME LE SAUX

A nat­u­ral left-back isn’t al­ways easy to find, but he was very con­fi­dent ven­tur­ing for­ward and never ne­glected his du­ties in de­fence. Po­si­tion­ing and spa­tial aware­ness – those were his hall­marks.

PAUL INCE

A grafter who would hus­tle and bus­tle in the mid­field chan­nel, he was bril­liant at screen­ing the back four be­cause he could run across the field and fill space in dif­fer­ent po­si­tions. A real de­stroyer.

RCM

DAVID BECK­HAM

I have to in­clude Becks purely for the qual­ity of his crosses and dead balls. He was the set-piece mas­ter, with phe­nom­e­nal tech­ni­cal abil­ity, and had a great in­flu­ence on the team. Plus, he was al­ways will­ing to con­trib­ute.

LCM

AM

CF

CF

GARY McAL­LIS­TER

Even as a player, you could see he had a knack for man­age­ment, and as a se­nior player he helped with the coach­ing in our side. He was very dis­ci­plined – al­ways the first to train­ing – and a model pro.

GIAN­FRANCO ZOLA

I was al­ways tasked with man-mark­ing him, and it was tough: he was skil­ful, strong and very good tech­ni­cally. He pulled the strings, was clever on the ball, and his drib­bling was un­be­liev­able.

ALAN SHEARER

There was noth­ing fancy about him, but he was highly ef­fec­tive. He didn’t aim to score beau­ti­ful goals; he just wanted to con­vert, be it off his knee, chest or el­bow. Dif­fi­cult to han­dle in the air, too.

THIERRY HENRY

I played against some great strik­ers but with dev­as­tat­ing pace and ex­cep­tional tech­nique, al­ways pass­ing the ball into the net, Thierry comes up trumps. You couldn’t man-mark him, as he’d go deep.

SUB­STI­TUTES

TONY ADAMS

He was a leader who com­manded the de­fence and had great an­tic­i­pa­tion – and he scored goals, too.

ROY KEANE

He had nerves of steel and bossed his team-mates to get the best out of them.

DEN­NIS BERGKAMP

Bergkamp was a ma­gi­cian with the ball at his feet, and his vi­sion was breath­tak­ing.

COACH

ALEX FER­GU­SON

Fergie would get my team go­ing. As an old-school tac­ti­cian, he never had any time for prima don­nas and let his play­ers know who was boss. He earned their re­spect. His man-man­age­ment was the se­cret to

his suc­cess.

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