THE IN­NO­VA­TORS

THERE ARE MIL­LIONS OF PEO­PLE WHO CAN PLAY THE GUI­TAR RE­ALLY WELL. THOU­SANDS PLAY WITH THEIR OWN UNIQUE STYLE, BUT THERE WILL ONLY EVER BE A HAND­FUL OF PEO­PLE THAT PER­MA­NENTLY CHANGE HOW WE SEE, HEAR AND PLAY THE IN­STRU­MENT. TO­DAY, WE SALUTE THEM, AND OFFE

Australian Guitar - - Feature - PETER HODG­SON

Mu­sic is built on in equal mea­sure on in­no­va­tion and in­spi­ra­tion. Ev­ery now and then, a player comes along with the per­fect bal­ance of the two: the in­spi­ra­tion to do some­thing dif­fer­ent, and the abil­ity to pull their vi­sion off.

The lucky ones go on to change the way the rest of us ap­proach the in­stru­ment. It hap­pened in the ‘50s and ‘60s when thou­sands of play­ers be­gan throw­ing out their low E string, shift­ing the re­main­ing strings down a slot and us­ing a banjo string for the high E, be­fore light-gauge gui­tar string sets were a thing.

It hap­pened when thou­sands of play­ers re­alised that turn­ing an amp up to the point of dis­tor­tion was ac­tu­ally a pos­i­tive thing, in­stead of some­thing to be avoided.

And it hap­pened when the fol­low­ing play­ers brought new ap­proaches to the in­stru­ment – ap­proaches that were both dif­fer­ent enough to turn heads, and ac­ces­si­ble enough for the av­er­age player to in­cor­po­rate into their own shred­ding.

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