CON LU­CAS TE­LOS DIS­TRI­BU­TION

Australian HIFI - - PROFILE - By Pe­ter Xeni

Three men gath­ered at Con’s place on the coast to lis­ten to an au­dio sys­tem as­pir­ing to Jay Gatsby’s ideal—‘the unattain­able dream’ of per­fec­tion—the ideal sys­tem in their case, cost no ob­ject. The green dock light in the Scott Fitzger­ald novella is said to rep­re­sent that unattain­able dream, the ‘dream so close that one could hardly fail to grasp it.’ The light on the pier near Con’s home blinked in the wind be­tween the tea trees as he placed the sty­lus on the open­ing groove. In the opin­ion of those seated in the room, the night air was charged with ar­guably the finest ‘life-like’ au­dio they were ever likely to hear.

They nod­ded in agree­ment about the de­tail be­gin­ning with the Helix turntable and MySon­ics Labs car­tridge and end­ing with the Apogees. Each of these men had more than 40 years of au­dio ex­pe­ri­ence and each of them had not heard those record­ings so clearly. The ca­bling alone was worth more than a year’s salary; the power sup­ply was iso­lated from the mains to the house—ev­ery de­tail ex­am­ined—and from that pure source the rest of this über sys­tem fired into Rid­ers on the Storm.

Au­dio­philes know that this fa­mous Doors record­ing has rain fall­ing from the very be­gin­ning of the song to the very end—but most sys­tems aren’t so­phis­ti­cated enough to re­solve this level of de­tail. For those priv­i­leged to be in­vited, it was a re­mark­able ex­pe­ri­ence to hear lay­ers of woolly au­dio stripped back, re­veal­ing the crys­talline clar­ity of the orig­i­nal record­ing.

The green light in the Gatsby novella is said to rep­re­sent the unattain­able dream, the ‘dream so close that one could hardly fail to grasp it.’ That night, Rid­ers on the Storm had phys­i­cal­ity to the sound: you could nearly grasp it. The rain pound­ing on the win­dows was vir­tu­ally in­dis­cernible from the rain in the record­ing.

The qual­ity of the equip­ment is the re­sult of Con Lu­cas re-chan­nelling his busi­ness acu­men into his love of au­dio. Te­los is his au­dio dis­tri­bu­tion com­pany. He im­ports the Yp­silon Hype­r­ion monoblocs that pro­duced the scin­til­lat­ing sound via the Apogee Scin­til­las (no pun in­tended)—in a spe­cially sound treated room.

‘I have been in­ter­ested in au­dio since I was about ten,’ he said, re­clin­ing back. ‘My in­ter­est re­ally took a step when I built a Klip­schorn from blue­prints at school with a whiz kid class­mate of mine. At six­teen, I pur­chased a Har­man-Kar­don Rabco ST-7. Vinyl was still the way I mostly lis­tened to mu­sic through the CD era. I first had a pair of Al­tec Lans­ings, then Ce­lestion Dit­tons, plus a Bench­mark, a Merid­ian CD player—I bought the best Ge­orge Secher had in his shop. I had spent too much time work­ing and I was yearn­ing to re­turn to my child­hood in­ter­est. By this stage, the im­por­tance of ca­bles was noted and a whole new ball­game in hi-fi had to be learnt (points to his au­dio wiring).’

Left to Right: Matt Jeli­cich (Mel­bourne Au­dio Club— for­mer pres­i­dent); Con Lu­cas (Te­los Dis­tri­bu­tion) and Pro­fes­sor Paul Boon (Vic­to­ria Univer­sity, Mel­bourne).

,The qual­ity of the equip­ment is the re­sult of Con Lu­cas re-chan­nelling his busi­ness acu­men into his love of au­dio.

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