SELF CON­FI­DENCE COUN­TERS THE EF­FECTS OF STRESS

Australian Natural Bodz - - Health, Sex & Longevity -

Whereas a num­ber of pre­vi­ous stud­ies demon­strate the im­por­tance of boost­ing self-es­teem in one’s ado­les­cent years, a team from Con­cor­dia Univer­sity (Canada) sug­gests that it is just as im­por­tant for older adults to main­tain and im­prove upon those con­fi­dence lev­els as they en­ter their twi­light years.

Sarah Y. Liu and col­leagues met with 147 adults, ages 60 years and over, to mea­sure their cor­ti­sol lev­els, self-es­teem, stress, and symp­toms of de­pres­sion ev­ery 24 months over four years. Self-es­teem was mea­sured through stan­dard­ized ques­tions. The study also took into ac­count per­sonal and health fac­tors like eco­nomic sta­tus, whether the par­tic­i­pant was mar­ried or sin­gle, and mor­tal­ity risk.

The team re­vealed that main­tain­ing or even im­prov­ing self-es­teem may help to buf­fer po­ten­tial health threats typ­i­cally as­so­ci­ated with the tran­si­tion into older adult­hood.

Ref­er­ence: Sarah Y. Liu, Carsten Wrosch, Gre­gory E. Miller, Jens C. Pruess­ner. “Self-es­teem change and di­ur­nal cor­ti­sol se­cre­tion in older adult­hood.” Psy­choneu­roen­docrinol­ogy, Vol­ume 41, March 2014, Pages 111-120.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.