Wed­ding nails

NAIL IT ON YOUR WED­DING DAY WITH BEAU­TI­FULLY MAN­I­CURED FIN­GER­TIPS. BRIDE AND GROOM SPOKE TO BEAUTY THER­A­PIST JESS BRUCE FROM GLOSS HAIR AND BEAUTY BOU­TIQUE, SHEP­PAR­TON, FOR TIPS ON HOW TO LOOK POL­ISHED FROM YOUR THUMB TO YOUR TOE.

Bride and Groom - - CONTENTS -

Acrylic

nails Jess be­lieved acrylic nails had lost pop­u­lar­ity. “In my opin­ion it’s fad­ing out,” she said. “I think it is very harm­ful for the nail.” “Even one ap­pli­ca­tion of acrylic nails can de­stroy the nail bed,” she said. “To re­pair it­self it can take six months for the nail to reach the fresh root of the nail.”

Gel nails

Jess uses Bio Sculp­ture Gel on her clients, which is a for­mula de­signed to go on the nat­u­ral nail. “The fan­tas­tic thing of the gel is that it nat­u­rally bends and grows with the nails,” she said. “There are dif­fer­ent gels for dif­fer­ent nail beds such as short nails, long nail or weak nails. It’s great for when a client is try­ing to grow or strengthen their nails.” She rec­om­mended brides who had short or weak nails who wanted to grow and strengthen them to start gel ap­pli­ca­tions six months prior to the wed­ding date. “It’s not a one ap­pli­ca­tion fix — it’s a pe­riod of six months to get the nat­u­ral nail where you want it to be,” she said. “It’s like your hair or your skin when you start treat­ing your hair or start get­ting fa­cials.”

Shel­lac nails

Jess said shel­lac was in­tro­duced af­ter gel and is a gel-based pol­ish. “It’s the same sort of pro­ce­dure — we have to cure it un­der a lamp,” she said. “Shel­lac is like a gel, you put it on the nat­u­ral nail and you do not do tips. “It’s not as ex­pen­sive so it would be good for a bride on a bud­get.” She said shel­lac was also a good op­tion for a bride who was al­ready happy with their nat­u­ral nails. “Shel­lac can’t be built up and made thicker as we could with gels,” she said. “But over­all, both op­tions are great and we have a lot of colours to choose from.”

Trends

Jess said the cur­rent colour trend for brides was nude and avoid­ing bright colours such as red or purple. She ad­vised against long nails and tra­di­tional French nails. “French nails have al­ways been a bridal nail but I don’t find that as pop­u­lar these days,” she said. “If I do a French, I might do a lit­tle bit of glit­ter to make it a bit more mod­ern. “I love jazzing it up a bit with some gold foil, se­quins, dia­manties — but I don’t go over­board.” Jess said while some brides have a bit of fun with nails, most brides chose a con­ser­va­tive look for their wed­ding day.

Prepa­ra­tion tips

If you want to strengthen and grow your nails but a six-month gel pro­ce­dure is out of your bud­get, use a nail hard­ener (Jess’ favourite is Dr Lewinn’s). A nail hard­ener is also rec­om­mended when you have an oc­cu­pa­tion that doesn’t al­low gel or pol­ish. Use a cu­ti­cle oil ev­ery day or as of­ten as you can, Jess rec­om­mends twice a day. Watch what you do at home — wash the dishes with gloves and watch what chem­i­cals are on your hands. Get the look you want for your wed­ding day one or two days prior.

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