Who pays for what

THE EX­CITE­MENT OF BE­ING NEWLY EN­GAGED AND PLAN­NING YOUR LIVES TO­GETHER CAN QUICKLY BE TEM­PERED BY THE FI­NAN­CIAL RE­AL­ITY OF OR­GAN­IS­ING YOUR DREAM WED­DING.

Bride and Groom - - CONTENTS -

Re­search sug­gests the av­er­age Aus­tralian wed­ding costs be­tween $30 000 and $40 000 and for cou­ples who al­ready have mone­tary obli­ga­tions such as a mort­gage or HECS debt, or who have a low in­come or are on one in­come, ad­just­ments will need to be made. Tra­di­tion dic­tates the bride’s fam­ily pays for the bulk of the wed­ding ex­penses, but with the ma­jor­ity of cou­ples mar­ry­ing in 2015 be­ing fi­nan­cially in­de­pen­dent of their fam­i­lies, this sce­nario may no longer be ap­pli­ca­ble. The to­tal cost will de­pend on the style of wed­ding you want. A ca­sual out­door cer­e­mony at home fol­lowed by a cock­tail-style func­tion at a small restau­rant will be sig­nif­i­cantly more af­ford­able than a five-course sit-down din­ner for 200 guests at a for­mal re­cep­tion venue. Com­mu­ni­ca­tion is the key, be­tween the bridal cou­ple and their fam­i­lies, bear­ing in mind at all times that the wed­ding day is a cel­e­bra­tion of love and no-one should be forced to con­trib­ute more than they can af­ford. Once you’ve set your to­tal bud­get you can start ob­tain­ing quotes; you may have to set­tle for less ex­pen­sive al­ter­na­tives in or­der to af­ford the items that are so im­por­tant you will not com­pro­mise on. Shar­ing wed­ding costs be­tween the cou­ple and both fam­i­lies is be­com­ing in­creas­ingly com­mon. Listed are sev­eral op­tions mod­ern cou­ples are us­ing: • Work out a price per head for the to­tal wed­ding cost or wed­ding re­cep­tion and sug­gest each side pay for the guests they in­vite. In this in­stance no party should feel they have over con­trib­uted. • If the cou­ple pays for their own wed­ding each fam­ily could of­fer to pay for a spe­cific item as a gift; the bride’s fam­ily might pay for her wed­ding gown and the groom’s fam­ily for the hon­ey­moon. • The cou­ple’s fam­i­lies share the cost of the wed­ding re­cep­tion and the bride and groom pay all other ex­penses. • Costs are cal­cu­lated and split equally three ways be­tween the soon-to-be-wed cou­ple, the bride’s fam­ily and the groom’s fam­ily. If you are for­tu­nate enough to have the tra­di­tional ap­proach of­fered, the gen­eral ex­penses in­curred by each fam­ily are: Bride and fam­ily • In­vi­ta­tions and an­nounce­ments • Bride’s gown and ac­ces­sories • Cer­e­mony flow­ers and dec­o­ra­tions • Pho­tog­ra­phy and video • Re­cep­tion — food, drinks, dec­o­ra­tion and en­ter­tain­ment • Wed­ding cake • Groom’s wed­ding ring • Bom­bon­niere Groom and fam­ily • Bride’s en­gage­ment and wed­ding rings • Wed­ding cer­e­mony or church fees • Wed­ding cars • Flow­ers — bride and brides­maids’ bou­quets, men’s bou­ton­nieres and

cor­sages for moth­ers of the bride and groom. • Groom’s suit • Wed­ding night ac­com­mo­da­tion • Hon­ey­moon The bridal party • Kitchen tea • Hens’ and bucks’ night cel­e­bra­tions • Brides­maids dresses, shoes, hair and make-up • Groomsmen’s suit hire

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