Run­ning on empty?

Con­stant ex­haus­tion is bad for your health

Central and North Burnett Times - - SPORT - with Rowena Hardy Rowena Hardy is a fa­cil­i­ta­tor, per­for­mance coach and part­ner of Minds Aligned: www.mind­saligned.com.au

If you find that you feel slug­gish or tired af­ter eat­ing or drink­ing cer­tain things then it may be worth cut­ting them out for a few days...

THERE seem to be a lot of peo­ple who feel ei­ther per­ma­nently tired or down­right ex­hausted all the time. Is that you or some­one you know?

Be­ing ex­hausted is an un­healthy state to be in and stops us from re­ally en­joy­ing and en­gag­ing with life and all that it of­fers. It can also im­pair judg­ment, af­fect con­cen­tra­tion and cause ir­ri­tabil­ity and for­get­ful­ness. Mod­ern life cer­tainly places pres­sure on us at times and there are al­ways myr­iad things we could worry about. So there may be mul­ti­ple causes for our ex­haus­tion. But, let’s be hon­est, we can be our own worst en­emy.

If your level of fa­tigue has you look­ing for some­thing to kick-start each day or boost your “en­ergy” lev­els such as caf­feine or sugar, dream­ing of an af­ter­noon nap at 11am or long­ing for a beer or glass of wine at the end of the day then it’s time to pay at­ten­tion to the cause.

If you carry a lot of anx­i­ety all the time, whether low-level or full blown, over time it can lead to con­tin­ual fa­tigue and ex­haus­tion. Re­mem­ber that anx­i­ety is about an un­known out­come, ie a fu­ture-based state, so what is it that caus­ing your anx­ious­ness?

It is also worth get­ting a thor­ough check from your health­care prac­ti­tioner be­cause there could be an un­der­ly­ing med­i­cal con­di­tion caus­ing the ex­haus­tion.

An­other area to look at is eat­ing habits. Poor habits, low-qual­ity food, lack of fresh in­gre­di­ents, over-eat­ing, un­der-eat­ing and tim­ing of meals can all con­trib­ute to poor di­ges­tion and af­fect qual­ity of sleep, which has an im­pact on our en­ergy lev­els and con­trib­utes to our over­all fa­tigue.

If you find that you feel slug­gish or tired af­ter eat­ing or drink­ing cer­tain things then it may be worth cut­ting them out for a few days and note any dif­fer­ence.

What about your wa­ter in­take? Many of us just don’t drink enough wa­ter, mis­tak­ing thirst for hunger, and be­ing de­hy­drated can add to fa­tigue and ex­haus­tion.

The last sug­ges­tion is to take a look at your life over­all. If you are con­stantly busy, par­tic­u­larly if it’s for other peo­ple and fo­cus­ing on the next thing, you are us­ing and cre­at­ing ner­vous en­ergy and life can be­come a bit like a to-do list.

Ev­ery­one’s en­ergy lev­els can fluc­tu­ate but if you feel you’re con­stantly run­ning on empty then it’s time to ex­plore why and to find ways of con­serv­ing some for you as well as find­ing the things that sus­tain and re-en­er­gise you.

PHOTO: FIZKES

◗ Ev­ery­one’s en­ergy lev­els can fluc­tu­ate but if you feel you’re con­stantly run­ning on empty then it’s time to ex­plore why.

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