KEY TO KEEP ON TRACK

HABITS REIGN SUPREME, SO FIND WHAT YOU LOVE AND YOU WON’T HAVE TO RELY ON WILLPOWER ALONE TO GET YOU OUT OF BED FOR THAT WORK­OUT

Central and North Burnett Times - - WELLBEING - KARLA GIL­BERT

The morn­ing alarm sounds, you’re all psyched and ready to tackle your fresh fit­ness goal. You have the pro­gram, the knowl­edge (to an ex­tent), hot new out­fit and noth­ing is go­ing to stop you. The first few weeks of the “new you” are fine, af­ter this things be­gin to feel a lit­tle mo­not­o­nous. Per­haps you don’t see re­sults as fast as you would like or sleep­ing in seems a more at­trac­tive propo­si­tion. Your willpower has faded ... or com­pletely left the build­ing. The main is­sue most of us face is hop­ing we fol­low through with a fit­ness reg­i­men by do­ing what we be­lieve we should be do­ing. The big­gest clincher here is find­ing and do­ing some­thing you like/love/can’t get enough of. Your friends may be see­ing re­sults with a cer­tain style of ex­er­cise, but if it’s some­thing that doesn’t get you at least a lit­tle bit ex­cited then it just ain’t go­ing to hap­pen. The key to last­ing change and life­long be­hav­iours is do­ing some­thing you en­joy enough to want to con­tinue do­ing it. Willpower is great to get you out of bed when the sun is shin­ing for a lovely walk, but once it hits win­ter and it’s chilly and dark then our habits and rou­tines reign supreme. This is where a well thought out, in­di­vid­u­alised, move­ment-based pro­gram that you’ve cre­ated (or had in­put with) shines through. Per­haps you didn’t re­ally gel with the orig­i­nal pro­gram. Don’t give up, just go back to the draw­ing board and ask your­self what ac­tiv­i­ties you en­joy do­ing, and what po­ten­tial road­blocks you will face. What makes you feel good? What does ex­er­cise mean to you? By al­low­ing space for new be­liefs and ex­pec­ta­tions you are shift­ing work­ing out to a more im­me­di­ate re­ward. From a chore to a gift. I don’t love ev­ery as­pect of fit­ness. Well, I lie, there are cer­tain types of work­outs I pre­fer over oth­ers that get me ex­cited about mak­ing the time. Be­ing the en­durance junkie that I am, run­ning a marathon doesn’t rock my boat, but stick me out in the mid­dle of a Hawai­ian chan­nel and I would hap­pily pad­dle the same dis­tance. The same can be said for the gym, but leave me to my own de­vices at home and I can eas­ily and hap­pily punch out a cre­ative cir­cuit work­out. Can you see it’s more about find­ing a unique an­gle you love do­ing? The next step is to not get too caught up in the process of the smaller de­tails. The most im­por­tant fac­tor of your fit­ness equa­tion is just cre­at­ing the habit of mak­ing the time and com­mit­ting to start­ing the process. The rest will come later. We of­ten over­anal­yse stuff that doesn’t mat­ter. The num­ber of reps, the gear we are go­ing to wear, the cor­rect tech­niques (which is im­por­tant at some stage), but the big­gest draw­card for you in em­brac­ing fit­ness as part of your life­style is by sim­ply just do­ing it. Be­ing con­sis­tent with mak­ing the time and al­low­ing your­self to build mo­men­tum. This is what is go­ing to get you through when there is no willpower to draw upon. Per­haps all you can fit in is 25-30 min­utes out of your 10-hour day — that is per­fectly fine and all you need for an ef­fec­tive work­out. Look at it this way: You’re de­vot­ing less than 2-3 per cent of your day to ex­er­cise, and it might be this 3 per cent that shifts your mind­set to a more pos­i­tive di­rec­tion for the re­main­der. If you are pressed for time, it’s best to limit the time you spend trav­el­ling. Make it con­ve­nient with less de­ci­sions. Have you ever re­con­sid­ered that work­out you did as you watched a beau­ti­ful sun rise or set? Hardly, and this is what you should be fo­cus­ing on rather than the small de­tails that are ir­rel­e­vant if you don’t even make it out of bed. Look at the pos­i­tive trade-offs and worry about the rest when you be­gin. Habit for­ma­tion is the pot of gold you’re look­ing for and it be­gins here.

Cham­pion iron­woman and ocean ath­lete Karla Gil­bert is an ac­cred­ited Nu­tri­tion and Health Coach and cer­ti­fied Level III and IV Fit­ness Trainer, with cer­tifi­cates in Child Nu­tri­tion and Nu­tri­tion.

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