WISE WORDS…

WITH DANIELLE LAPORTE While yoga pants and IN­SPI­RA­TIONAL quotes crowd our news­feeds, one AU­THOR and blog­ger is get­ting real about SUC­CESS and WELL­BE­ING.

Collective Hub - - THOUGHT LEADER - IN­TER­VIEW LISA MES­SEN­GER / WORDS NI­COLE WEBB

In a world over­flow­ing with green smoothies and yoga gu­rus, Danielle LaPorte’s unique voice has pushed its way to the front of the crowded well­ness sphere. You could put her cult fol­low­ing – more than 150,000 In­sta­gram fol­low­ers and an­other 194,000 on Face­book – down to her abil­ity to blend spir­i­tu­al­ity with the re­al­i­ties of build­ing a prof­itable busi­ness, as she helps her read­ers on their jour­ney of self-im­prove­ment.

Start­ing her ca­reer as a re­tail as­sis­tant at The Body Shop, Danielle worked her way up to a role within the com­pany’s So­cial In­ven­tions de­part­ment be­fore be­com­ing the ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor of The Ar­ling­ton In­sti­tute, a Wash­ing­ton-based think tank spe­cial­is­ing in fu­tures stud­ies.

But, when the dot-com bust hap­pened, Danielle headed back to her na­tive Canada and be­gan blog­ging. She has since be­come a pop­u­lar speaker, per­sonal con­sul­tant (her e-pro­gram gross­ing US$170,000 in its first year) and au­thor (one of her books, The De­sire Map, has sold more than 120,000 copies). She is an author­ity fig­ure on us­ing your nat­u­ral abil­i­ties – she’s proud to have never stud­ied at col­lege – and cre­at­ing a per­sonal brand.

Here, this soul searcher ex­plains her shift away from the self-help space, pros­per­ing fi­nan­cially and, well, the mean­ing of life (at least, her take on it).

I THINK YOUR PUR­POSE IS TO BE HAPPY.

We can split philo­soph­i­cal hairs on hap­pi­ness ver­sus joy. So I would pol­ish it up – if I can pol­ish up the words of [the] Dalai Lama – and say your pur­pose in life is joy, and joy doesn’t al­ways look like hap­pi­ness. Joy can be re­ally in­tense, joy is there even when suf­fer­ing is there.

IT’S NOT ABOUT GET­TING POINTS WITH THIS COSMIC COUN­CIL ABOUT HOW GOOD OF A PER­SON YOU ARE,

or how much of ser­vice you are, or how right you are; it’s about joy. And my def­i­ni­tion of joy is what hap­pens when you face your soul. It’s the re­sult of be­ing in your truth. I think it doesn’t re­ally mat­ter what you do in terms of ca­reer, or even who you marry – just choose and show up as your­self in any sit­u­a­tion. No one is keep­ing score.

EV­ERY­BODY HAS THE RIGHT TO PROS­PER FROM THEIR NAT­U­RAL TAL­ENTS,

and you get to de­fine what your nat­u­ral tal­ents are for you. And you get to de­fine your level, type and your flavour of pros­per­ity. Pros­per­ity for a lot of peo­ple has so much to do with free­dom, I mean, that’s what it is about for me.

THERE’S SO MUCH CRIT­I­CISM AROUND NOT BE­ING AU­THEN­TIC.

I think peo­ple are be­ing their true self all the time. Even if you’re be­ing an a***hole, that’s who you are in that mo­ment. If you’re be­ing con­stricted, re­stric­tive, that’s the best you’ve got. So I think [there needs to be] a re­fine­ment of the con­ver­sa­tion sur­round­ing au­then­tic­ity. I think there’s a dif­fer­ence be­tween au­then­tic­ity and truth, just like there’s a dif­fer­ence be­tween be­liefs and truth.

THE SELF-HELP AD­DIC­TION IS VERY SUB­TLE, BE­CAUSE IT LOOKS GOOD IN YOGA PANTS

and it looks re­ally re­spon­si­ble. I think we need to be med­i­tat­ing, we need rit­u­als. But you’ve got to be com­ing from a place of real heart-cen­tred en­thu­si­asm, not be­cause it’s ‘in’.

AND YOU KNOW WHAT THE GOOD NEWS IS?

All that prov­ing and striv­ing is per­fectly nat­u­ral and nor­mal. We’re all on track be­cause you’re go­ing to fall for a lot of lies on your way to the truth, and there can’t be any judge­ment about how messed up we are.

IN OUR HY­PER-MO­TI­VA­TIONAL CUL­TURE, SO­CIAL ME­DIA AND MO­TI­VA­TION IS LIKE CRACK.

There’s so much push­ing [for] an over­rid­ing of the nat­u­ral rhythm. Some­times we need to hon­our the re­sis­tance to show­ing up – we do need to stay in bed, we need to jump on a plane and go to an ashram, we need to can­cel things. >

WHEN YOU’RE AFRAID AND YOU STILL WANT TO SHOW UP,

of­ten, and not al­ways, it’s best to show up and say, ‘I’m ner­vous, I’m scared, I have doubts but I’m here, any­way.’ And you re­ally are hon­our­ing your show­ing up-ness in that space. But some­times it’s not safe to show up and say, ‘I’m scared, I’m tired and I don’t re­ally want to be here’, and those are the times when you need to dig deep and re­ally find this ath­leti­cism of con­fi­dence. You get tough… and you give it ev­ery­thing you’ve got, and those are the days you look back on and say, ‘I did that’, and then you go home and cry. But you ac­com­plish what’s best for your life and then you can be ten­der with your­self or with peo­ple who are cheer­ing for you.

[IF] PHI­LAN­THROPY AND CHAR­ITY IS NOT PART OF YOUR TRIPLE BOT­TOM LINE, THEN YOU’RE AC­TU­ALLY PART OF THE PROBLEM.

It’s not okay to just be neu­tral any­more and to do no harm. You ac­tu­ally have to… be ac­tively do­ing some good to get us through what we’re go­ing through.

You CER­TAINLY will not meet a fis­cally THRIV­ING per­son who has not FAILED.

HERE’S THE THING ABOUT FAIL­URE – YOU’RE ALL GO­ING TO FAIL,

it’s guar­an­teed. You’re all go­ing to fail and you’re go­ing to die and you’re go­ing to have your heart bro­ken at one point or an­other, so why don’t you just start any­way, be­cause it’s go­ing to hap­pen even­tu­ally, if it hasn’t hap­pened al­ready. You cer­tainly will not meet a fis­cally thriv­ing per­son who has not failed. It’s an ini­ti­a­tion – what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, to use that cliché. Pick one of the five things you’re noodling over right now and just do it.

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