PER­FECT YOUR START-UP PITCH

Collective Hub - - COVER - DON’T BE OVERLY LIT­ERAL.

Want to test your name out? Catch­word’s site has a list of 10 nam­ing cri­te­ria against which you can eval­u­ate a name’s over­all ef­fec­tive­ness. You’ll also find a down­load­able nam­ing guide to get you started.

It’s a rookie mis­take to throw the kitchen sink into the name or to be overly pro­saic. Your name doesn’t need to tell the whole story. An­other mis­take is get­ting too hung up on dot-com avail­abil­ity. Un­less your sales are gen­er­ated pri­mar­ily on­line, you may do just fine adding a short de­scrip­tor to your name to se­cure the URL.

BE SURE TO VET YOUR NAME LEGALLY.

Do­ing a sim­ple Google search will knock a lot of names out, and you can also check out free on­line trade­mark data­bases. But, re­ally, you should have a trade­mark at­tor­ney give you the thumbs up. Also make sure your name doesn’t mean any­thing bad in any lan­guage spo­ken by your tar­get au­di­ence (or any ma­jor lan­guage, for that mat­ter).

IDEALLY YOU WILL FILE FOR A TRADE­MARK IN ALL KEY MAR­KETS.

What hap­pens af­ter that will de­pend on the prod­uct, but usu­ally there will be com­mu­ni­ca­tion about the name choice to key staff and in­vestors, de­sign and pack­ag­ing work, in­cor­po­ra­tion of the name into web and mar­ket­ing copy, and so forth. And, of course, you’ll pop open a bot­tle of cham­pagne. The av­er­age hu­man at­ten­tion span is around eight sec­onds, so if you’ve got the ear of a po­ten­tial client or in­vestor, you’d bet­ter cut to the chase. And quick!

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