BE­COME THE VOICE OF AU­THOR­ITY

MISSED one of our re­cent COL­LEC­TIVE101 MAS­TER­CLASSES? We JOTTED down some HOT TIPS for you.

Collective Hub - - NOMAD - HOST: JULIE MASTERS GET THE 101 For the full pic­ture, sign up for Col­lec­tive101 mas­ter­classes at col­lec­tive­hub.co m/col­lec­tive101

Founder of global speaker man­age­ment com­pany ODE Man­age­ment

1 ASK THE IM­POR­TANT QUES­TIONS

If you’re in the process of as­sess­ing what you want to do and where you want to be, ask your­self some key ques­tions: what do you want to be known for, and why is it im­por­tant? Your an­swers will then shape your pur­suit and give you a mis­sion.

2 NAIL THE ‘C’s

When it comes to own­ing the sphere you sit in, Julie sug­gests con­vey­ing your point us­ing clar­ity, con­tri­bu­tion, chan­nels, col­lab­o­ra­tion, cap­ti­va­tion, con­sis­tency and cer­tainty. The first thing to do is draw your au­di­ence into lis­ten­ing to what you have to say. It’s not that the most in­flu­en­tial speak­ers in the world are cer­tain of ev­ery­thing, but they speak with cer­tainty about what they be­lieve in. It’s about own­ing your story and giv­ing the best you have, without wait­ing for per­fec­tion.

3 START STRONG

Ac­cord­ing to Julie, the first two min­utes of any pitch, pre­sen­ta­tion or in­spi­ra­tional speech mat­ter the most. The best speak­ers are not con­cerned with win­ning ap­proval from their au­di­ence, in­stead they aim to ed­u­cate them on what they know to be true. For one-on-one pre­sen­ta­tions, match your in­ten­sity, body lan­guage and pace to the sit­u­a­tion. For mul­ti­me­dia pre­sen­ta­tions, sim­ple aes­thet­ics such as light, mu­sic and clar­ity of speech will keep your viewer hooked. And when you’re faced with a dif­fi­cult crowd, draw­ing on your au­thor­ity by main­tain­ing eye con­tact and keep­ing your talk in­ter­ac­tive can help shift the room from de­spon­dent to en­gaged in a mat­ter of mo­ments.

4 STICK TO A STRUC­TURE

De­spite how much has changed for hu­man­ity, story-telling is still key. Julie rec­om­mends in­cor­po­rat­ing a mes­sage, a metaphor and a mean­ing into each main point. This will help give the clear­est ex­pla­na­tion, in a way the au­di­ence can re­late to.

Once you’ve started with a punchy in­tro and a dy­namic ex­pla­na­tion, close with the pur­pose you opened with. Strong end­ings con­sist of emo­tion, in­for­ma­tion and a re­quest. This brings your most im­por­tant point back to the fore­front of your lis­ten­ers’ minds.

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