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The Art of Dave Tay­lor

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“Star Wars came out when I was 10 and noth­ing else has had the same im­pact on my life as a cre­ative per­son. Any time I get the chance to do a Star Wars il­lus­tra­tion, if pos­si­ble, I jump at the chance. Of all my Star Wars il­lus­tra­tions, this might be my fa­vorite – it’s about that wan­der­lust for travel and ad­ven­ture that was pretty much only in that first film.” “I re­ally like this one be­cause it’s one of the very few jobs I’ve done where I get to em­ploy some hu­mour, the stuff usu­ally re­served for my con­ven­tion sketches. My cov­ers are usu­ally ‘se­ri­ous’ and my con sketches usu­ally fea­tured my plebian sense of hu­mour. It was all fun, start to fin­ish and al­most no job is like that. The girl try­ing to put her ro­bot to­gether is Sally and I want to draw her again.” them­selves to any­thing out­side the field of comics. Comics are bet­ter when the people cre­at­ing them bring a di­ver­sity of in­flu­ences to their cre­ations. I think comic cre­ators solely in­spired or taught just by comics and noth­ing else are cut­ting them­selves short. But I feel that way about ev­ery cre­ative en­deav­our: film­mak­ers should draw in­spi­ra­tion from things other than cin­ema; mu­si­cians shouldn’t just get their ideas from other mu­sic.”

AH:

You’ve be­come best known mostly as a cover artist rather than some­one who draws in­te­ri­ors. Is this just be­cause of prac­ti­cal con­sid­er­a­tions? And how im­por­tant is the cover for a comic?

“My ca­reer as a cover artist came about sim­ply be­cause I haven’t been of­fered a lot of in­te­rior work, for what­ever rea­son. A cover is very im­por­tant be­cause it’s the last line in ad­ver­tis­ing while also be­ing the first line in sto­ry­telling. The cover is how we con­vince a po­ten­tial reader into be­com­ing an ac­tual reader: if I can get some­one to pick up a comic, then once it’s in their hands they will prob­a­bly thumb through the is­sue, and hope­fully buy it.”

CH:

In 2012, you drew Be­fore Watch­men: Dr Man­hat­tan and this year, you have writ­ten and drawn a Bat­man Black And White story. What made you de­cide to take the plunge and go back to draw­ing in­te­ri­ors?

“Some­one at DC Comics asked me to do the in­te­ri­ors. It’s as sim­ple as that. I said yes be­cause I feel like a comic artist that never draws comics. The only prob­lem is that do­ing cov­ers for so many years has made me slower than ever.”

AH:

CH:

AH:

You wrote as well as drew the Bat­man Black And White story. Are you more con­fi­dent now about writ­ing your own ma­te­rial and will we see more work that you write and draw yourself?

“I’d like to write and draw more sto­ries. When I write I don’t have the same con­fi­dence is­sues I have when I draw be­cause I re­ally don’t con­sider my­self to be a writer. When I draw there’s all these ex­pec­ta­tions of fab­u­lous­ness. No one has any ex­pec­ta­tions of me as a writer, so, I’m free to have fun with it.”

CH:

You’ve be­come closely as­so­ci­ated with pro­duc­ing cov­ers for fe­male su­per­hero ti­tles such as Cat­woman, Ghost and Won­der Woman and you also do the cov­ers for Ver­tigo’s Fairest se­ries. What was it about that se­ries that par­tic­u­larly ap­pealed to you?

“Fairest isn’t a su­per­hero comic and I thought it’d be good for me to try my cre­ative hand at some­thing other than su­per­heroes. Su­per­heroes are swell but there’s so much more that comics are about, so I wanted to dip my toes in for­eign wa­ters.”

AH: CH: AH:

What are you cur­rently work­ing on? “Wrap­ping up the fi­nal 10 is­sues of Fairest cov­ers, and a bunch of stuff I can’t talk about. These ques­tions come lit­er­ally as I’m clos­ing the deals on a bunch of new and fun as­sign­ments. Some will sur­prise people, and some will make people go, ‘FI­NALLY!’” CH: Will we ever see All-Star Won­der Woman? AH: “No, I’m sorry; it’s a dead project.”

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