V FOR V ERTIGO

What makes a “Ver­tigo comic”?

Comic Heroes - - Feature -

Con­tro­versy and ex­per­i­men­ta­tion wasn’t the be-all and end-all of Ver­tigo un­der Karen Berger. The books all shared sim­i­lar themes, in­clud­ing what Berger refers to as the “an­ar­chic, re­bel­lious, rage-against-thema­chine or what­ever you want to call that al­most rev­o­lu­tion­ary, punk as­pect. I think it was a big part of what was so at­trac­tive about those se­ries. It just speaks to a lot of peo­ple at a cer­tain age, who want to defy the sys­tem and ques­tion the world that we live in and ex­plore the darker side and fol­low char­ac­ters who have am­bigu­ous moral­i­ties.

“That’s prob­a­bly the key thing that dif­fer­en­ti­ates a Ver­tigo pro­tag­o­nist from a su­per­hero pro­tag­o­nist – they’re com­pli­cated. They’re not black and white. You don’t al­ways agree with what they’re do­ing.”

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.