MORE RAVE SOUND-DE­SIGN TIPS

Computer Music - - Make Music Now -

IN THE LOOP Us­ing your sam­pler’s loop­ing fea­tures, you can take even the short­est, most ob­vi­ous rave snip­pet and turn it into a nev­erend­ing sus­tained tone ripe for mod­u­la­tion and ef­fects – also a great tech­nique for synth bass. OUT OF CON­TEXT

Why not try mak­ing a sig­na­ture sound from this fea­ture us­ing a to­tally dif­fer­ent syn­the­sis tech­nique? For ex­am­ple, in­stead of mak­ing a hoover us­ing ReDom­i­na­tor, you could use a wavetable synth such as NI Mas­sive for a very dif­fer­ent re­sult.

TURN THE ’TABLE

Car­ry­ing on the theme, you could al­ways load any clas­sic rave stab into Xfer Records’ Serum as a new wavetable os­cil­la­tor. From there, you can cre­ate an en­tirely fresh patch that still has a lit­tle of that clas­sic rave flavour.

SAM­PLE YOUR SAM­PLE

Cap­ture that clas­sic rave aes­thetic by record­ing your syn­the­sised rave sounds back into a sam­pler in­stru­ment, with any noise and/or dis­tor­tion baked di­rectly into the sam­pled au­dio. By trig­ger­ing this file up and down the key­board, the re­sult­ing sam­ple trun­ca­tion and repitch­ing will give you a rougher, more prim­i­tive sound akin to that of early rave.

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