Get it! Your dream job sorted in 10 easy steps

AND 10 OTHER TIPS TO GET JOB Kathryn Min­shew and Alexan­dra Cavoula­cos, co- founders of ca­reer re­source site The­muse. com and co- au­thors of The New Rules of Work, share their se­crets

Cosmopolitan (Australia) - - Contents -

PUT YOUR­SELF FIRST

A lot of peo­ple don’t sep­a­rate ‘ This is what my par­ents think suc­cess looks like’ or ‘ This is what my friends think is a sexy job’ from what it is they re­ally want. Take the time to think about your val­ues, strengths and what mat­ters to you. It’ll in­crease fu­ture job sat­is­fac­tion.

DON’T BE TOO PICKY

Ap­ply­ing for jobs is a lot like ap­ply­ing for uni, where you have your stretches (the schools you re­ally want to go to) and a cou­ple of safeties. Most peo­ple ap­ply only to their stretch jobs – even though not ev­ery­one can land a po­si­tion there. Make sure you’re look­ing at a wide swathe of op­tions – your dream jobs as well as ones that seem like a sure bet.

TIDY UP ON­LINE

Go through the f irst three to f ive pages of your pho­tos on so­cial me­dia and re­move any­thing that could be deemed un­pro­fes­sional. You would be sur­prised by how much can be seen on Face­book, ei­ther be­cause your ac­count is pub­lic, which we don’t rec­om­mend, or be­cause friends of friends can see it. The chance of some­one in your in­dus­try know­ing some­one who knows you is ac­tu­ally quite high, and hir­ing man­agers poke around.

UP­DATE YOUR EMAIL

If your email is Suelovescats @ya­hoo.com or Snazzy­pants @aol.com, it’s time to up­grade! It sounds ter­ri­ble, but we’ve heard from so many hir­ing man­agers that when they see a Ya­hoo or AOL email ad­dress, they’re not sure how tech savvy you are. Gmail is a safe bet.

STALK IF YOU HAVE TO

Fig­ure out i f you have any con­nec­tions with any­one in the com­pany us­ing LinkedIn or by do­ing a bit of Twit­ter stalk­ing. It’s worth it if you f ind some­one who could help an­swer ques­tions and get your ré­sumé to the top of the pile.

STICK TO THE 2/ 3 RULE

Some peo­ple think that if a job lists 10 qual­i­fi­ca­tion re­quire­ments, they have to meet all 10 (typ­i­cally, women are less likely to ap­ply than men are when they don’t meet all the reqs). In­stead, ask your­self, ‘ Do I meet at least two­thirds of the things on this list?’ For ex­am­ple, if a com­pany posts that a can­di­date should have a com­puter sci­ence de­gree and you don’t but you have every­thing else on the list in spades, go for it. Be thought­ful, though: if a job re­quires seven years of ex­pe­ri­ence and you’ve only got one, that’s prob­a­bly not good enough. do

TAI­LOR YOUR RÉ­SUMÉ

Look at the job de­scrip­tion and make sure you mir­ror it in some way. If a com­pany is re­ally large, the odds of your ap­pli­ca­tion be­ing screened by a robot be­fore a hu­man are high, so key­words are re­ally im­por­tant. Put your ré­sumé through a word­cloud tool like Word­clouds.com and see what jumps out. Com­pare those to the words in the job post­ing. You might be sur­prised to find that they don’t match up.

TREAT SKYPE LIKE IT’S IN- PER­SON

For any Skype or FaceTime in­ter­views, dress just like you would if you were meet­ing some­one face­to­face. It will im­prove how you feel, but it’s also smart in case the call takes an un­ex­pected turn. Al­ways wears pants… just in case you have to stand up.

ASK FOR A TIMELINE

The end of an in­ter­view is the best time to ask about next steps. Say, ‘OK, great. What’s your tim­ing on this? I want to make sure I know what to ex­pect, so I can be re­spon­sive to you.’ If they say, ‘ We have a bunch of peo­ple com­ing in next week and won’t know ’til the week af­ter,’ then you know when you should check in.

SAY THANKS ASAP

Send a thank­you email the same day as your in­ter­view. Be sure it’s per­son­alised – we know when it’s a form let­ter. You only need one or two lines to make it unique. Some peo­ple ap­pre­ci­ate a hand­writ­ten note, but only do that in ad­di­tion to an email. Un­less you can get the let­ter de­liv­ered that same day, you risk their mak­ing a de­ci­sion be­fore re­ceiv­ing it.

FOL­LOW UP WITH CAU­TION

There’s a bal­ance be­tween not giv­ing up and be­ing ob­nox­ious. Since you asked for a timeline up front, give them a cou­ple of days past it, then say, ‘I know you are fin­ish­ing up in­ter­views. I just want to check in on the sta­tus.’ Then wait again. And don’t send back­to­back emails.

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