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LOR­RAINE GRIF­FITHS’S GROWN-UP KIDS STILL EX­PECT TO FIND THIS CHILD­HOOD FAVOURITE IN HER BIS­CUIT TIN.

Country Style - - CONTENTS - WORDS SARAH NEIL PHO­TOG­RA­PHY AND STYLING CHINA SQUIR­REL

Lor­raine Grif­fif­fiths’s recipe for co­conut bis­cuits will al­ways be a favourite for her two chil­dren.

WHEN ASKED TO DE­SCRIBE her mother’s co­conut bis­cuits, 34-year-old Kacy Matel­jan replies, “Can I just say they taste like child­hood?” Grow­ing up in WA’S Swan Val­ley, Kacy says she spent most of her time bare­foot, play­ing with her brother and cousins among the grapevines on her fam­ily’s prop­erty or sneak­ing into the or­ange-pack­ing shed to push each other around in wooden crates on the roller con­vey­ors. But her fond­est mem­o­ries are of time spent bak­ing with her mum, Lor­raine Grif­fiths. “Sit­ting on the kitchen bench as we made the co­conut bis­cuits is such a good mem­ory of mine that it’s some­thing I can’t imag­ine not do­ing with my own chil­dren one day,” Kacy says. Lor­raine (pic­tured here with son Ben) came up with this recipe in the early 1980s. “I was look­ing for a bis­cuit I could make for the kids that was a bit health­ier, so I adapted a recipe by swap­ping half the white flour with whole­meal spelt flour and us­ing brown su­gar in­stead of white,” she says. “It’s a young heir­loom recipe, but they have to start some­where.” Kacy and Ben were only al­lowed store-bought treats on birth­days, but could count on find­ing co­conut bis­cuits in their school lunch boxes. “I don’t think I ap­pre­ci­ated hav­ing home­made bis­cuits be­cause it was all I’d ever known,” says Kacy. “It was only when I got older that I re­alised how spe­cial it was and now I as­so­ciate those bis­cuits with that safe, warm feel­ing you have as a kid.” Part of the ap­peal of the recipe is that it’s quick and easy to make. “They’re done in less than half an hour,” says Lor­raine, who now lives in Perth and works as a nurse. But she still finds time to bake co­conut bis­cuits and says “they are al­ways in the bis­cuit tin”. And Kacy can con­firm that her mum never fails to de­liver when it comes to this child­hood treat. “On nu­mer­ous oc­ca­sions I have gone straight to the bis­cuit tin to see whether she has any and I am yet to be dis­ap­pointed. They’re very more-ish and I never eat just one!”

If you look for­ward to this page each month, you’ll love Coun­try Style Heir­loom Recipes, $16.99, a col­lec­tion of 28 recipes and the sto­ries of the peo­ple who made them spe­cial. Avail­able at mag­son­line.com.au/ coun­try-style-spe­cials

SHARE YOUR FAM­ILY FAVOURITES

Do you have a recipe that has been gen­er­a­tions passed passed down through gen­er­a­tions? Send us your recipe, the story be­hind it and a pho­to­graph (prefer­ably a copy or scan) of the rel­a­tive who passed it on. Re­mem­ber to in­clude a day­time tele­phone num­ber. Email Sarah Neil at sarah.neil@news.com.au or send a let­ter to Heir­loom Recipe, Coun­try Style, Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria NSW 2015. Note: recipes may also be pub­lished on­line at home­life.com.au

CO­CONUT BIS­CUITS

Makes 22 90g but­ter, chopped ½ cup self-rais­ing flour ½ cup whole­meal spelt flour 1 cup shred­ded co­conut ¾ cup firmly packed brown su­gar 1 ex­tra-large egg, lightly whisked 22 (about 40g) pe­can or wal­nut halves

Pre­heat oven to 175°C. Line 3 large bak­ing trays with bak­ing pa­per. Melt but­ter in a small saucepan over a low heat. Re­move from heat and set aside for 10 min­utes to cool. Com­bine flours, co­conut and brown su­gar in a large bowl. Add melted but­ter and egg, then mix un­til well com­bined. Roll ta­ble­spoon­fuls of co­conut mix­ture into balls and place, about 5cm apart to al­low room for spread­ing, on pre­pared trays. Us­ing the back of a tea­spoon, gen­tly flat­ten bis­cuits. Press a pe­can into top of each bis­cuit. Bake for 10–12 min­utes or un­til golden. Cool on trays. Store in an air­tight con­tainer.

For more heir­loom recipes, visit home­life.com.au/recipes

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