Flip the flash

Digital Camera World - - 10 GOLDEN RULES OF SUMMER -

En­sure that you are close to your sub­ject so that the flash ef­fect can ac­tu­ally be seen

A flash­gun is not just for af­ter dark: it can also be your best friend when the sun is shin­ing Flash has an amazing abil­ity to change the look of your images – but par­tic­u­larly so dur­ing day­light hours. On a cloudy day, fill-in flash in­creases con­trast and boosts colour, help­ing to make sub­jects stand out from drab grey sur­round­ings. On a bright day, a flash al­lows you cut through the shad­ows – on a per­son’s face, for ex­am­ple – es­sen­tially re­duc­ing the con­trast of the image to give a much more pleas­ing re­sult, and adding a sparkling white catch­light to their eyes.

A flash­gun is not as pow­er­ful as the sun, so en­sure that you are close to your sub­ject so that the flash ef­fect can ac­tu­ally be seen – don’t stand more than a pace or two away, and use a wide lens if you need to.

A cam­era’s built-in pop-up flash is more than ad­e­quate of do­ing this trick – but a sep­a­rate flash­gun with more max­i­mum power will give you more cre­ative con­trol. By vary­ing the shut­ter speed, ISO, flash power and aperture, you also al­ter the rel­a­tive bright­ness of the back­drop against the flash­lit fore­ground, for dra­matic ‘stro­bist’ ef­fects.

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