HEALTH MYTHS BUSTED

Some of the ru­mours go­ing around are to­tal BS – we’re here to tell you the truth.

Dolly - - Contents -

We sep­a­rate the BS from the truth.

THE MYTH: CHO­CO­LATE CAUSES ACNE.

Ev­ery time you have a to­tal melt­down ’cos you’ve wo­ken up with a pim­ple that’s the size of a crater, there’s al­ways that one fool who says “Maybe you’ve been eat­ing too much cho­co­late!”. Well guess what? They’re wrong! There’s no sci­en­tific ev­i­dence to sug­gest Caramello Koalas and the like cause break­outs. Now pass us that big box of Favourites!

THE MYTH: IF YOU FEEL COLD, YOU’LL CATCH A COLD.

Here’s one that’ll Blow. Your. Mind. You’re al­ways given that chill­ing warn­ing that if you go out­side with­out a jacket in win­ter, you’ll catch a cold. But the stone-cold truth (pun to­tally in­tended) is that you can only catch a cold from a virus. The myth came about ’cos dur­ing win­ter we’re more likely to spend time in­doors, giv­ing viruses a bet­ter chance of spread­ing around.

THE MYTH: US­ING ELEC­TRONIC DE­VICES FOR TOO LONG CAN DAM­AGE YOUR EYES.

Bad news for Snapchat ad­dicts (lit­er­ally all of us): a 2015 re­port by The Vi­sion Coun­cil found that up to 68 per cent of peeps ex­pe­ri­ence eye strain when they use elec­tronic de­vices (phones, tablets, lap­tops) for too long. After 20 min­utes of star­ing at a screen, ex­perts rec­om­mend look­ing away for at least 20 sec­onds. You should also blink at least 10 times ev­ery 20 min­utes and turn the bright­ness down a tad to pro­tect your peep­ers.

THE MYTH: YOU CAN EAT A PIECE OF FOOD THAT’S FALLEN ON THE FLOOR IF YOU PICK IT UP WITHIN FIVE SEC­ONDS.

Ah, the good ol’ five-sec­ond rule that’s been your sav­ing grace all those times you’ve wanted to eat the treat that you clum­sily dropped on the floor. We’re sorry to break this to you, but the rule you’ve been liv­ing by is com­pletely false. Bac­te­ria from the floor can con­tam­i­nate your food in mere mil­lisec­onds. Dang! So next time, just throw what­ever it is in the bin.

THE MYTH: YOU SHOULDN’T SWIM IM­ME­DI­ATELY AFTER YOU EAT.

Your mum makes you hang back after you’ve had your beach­side sand­wich ’cos ap­par­ently you shouldn’t swim after you eat, forc­ing you to miss out on pre­cious perv­ing mo­ments. But ex­perts have found there’s ac­tu­ally noth­ing wrong with eat­ing be­fore a leisurely swim. So un­less you’re com­pet­ing in an in­tense swim­ming race, it’s to­tally OK to chow down be­fore tak­ing a dip.

THE MYTH: AN AP­PLE A DAY KEEPS THE DOC­TOR AWAY.

Think this was just a lie your par­ents told to make you eat healthy? Well, it turns out they were ac­tu­ally telling the truth. Re­search has found that ap­ples fight off all kinds of sick­nesses, from cancer to strokes, and they also break down choles­terol, clear­ing up the ar­ter­ies and there­fore low­er­ing the risk of hav­ing a heart at­tack. Moral of the story: keep smash­ing them crisp red fruits.

THE MYTH: IF SOME­ONE KNOCKS YOU HARD IN THE BOOB, YOU’LL GET BREAST CANCER.

This one is so ridic that it’s al­most hi­lar­i­ous. Phys­i­cal blows to the breast CAN­NOT cause breast cancer. They can, how­ever, cause scar tis­sue, bruis­ing and swelling, which are ob­vi­ously things you’ll want to avoid. So fear not if you bump your boob or if a bat­tle with your sis­ter gets a lit­tle rough – it can’t re­sult in cancer.

THE MYTH: IF YOU HOLD HANDS WITH SOME­ONE WHO HAS WARTS, YOU’LL GET WARTS.

This one is gross but 100 per cent true. Warts are con­tracted when the virus comes in con­tact with your skin, and it can be spread by touch­ing a wart on an­other per­son’s bod and even by touch­ing a sur­face that the per­son with warts has touched. So if your BF has a nasty wart, you may want to avoid hold­ing his hand un­til it cools off.

THE MYTH: IT TAKES SEVEN YEARS TO DIGEST GUM IF YOU SWAL­LOW IT.

You’ve been busted chew­ing gum in class and your teacher gives you an ul­ti­ma­tum: ei­ther swal­low the gum or throw it in the bin, at which time one of your friends says “But if you swal­low gum it won’t come out for seven years”. That’s not true. Noth­ing can re­side in your stom­ach for that long un­less it is so huge that it gets stuck in your in­tes­tine. But we rec­om­mend toss­ing it in the bin any­ways, ’cos ew.

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