Di­ablo’s creator on poor money man­age­ment, the dan­gers of work­ing with li­cences, and trans­form­ing the RPG genre

EDGE - - TOKYO RUSH - BY BEN MAXWELL Pho­tog­ra­phy Daniel Griliopoulos

There’s a mis­chievous streak to the way David Bre­vik re­counts the key mo­ments of his ca­reer, one re­flected in the de­ci­sions he’s made along the way. This is the man who rein­vig­o­rated the RPG genre with Di­ablo by opt­ing to skip straight to click­ing skele­tons to death. He also stalled Bliz­zard for month (prior to join­ing it) for a fix that took him less than a day to code. While his un­easy re­la­tion­ship with bud­gets and dead­lines has nearly scup­pered him on mul­ti­ple oc­ca­sions, he de­liv­ers each tale with the kind of con­fi­dent lev­ity that comes from prov­ing him­self over and over again. And yet one of gam­ing’s most in­flu­en­tial de­sign­ers only stopped coast­ing be­cause he got to port an ob­scure ar­cade game.

“JEFF WAS LIKE, ‘I DON’T KNOW, THIS GAME IS TOO GOOFY, TOO WEIRD.’ SO WE TURNED DOWN MOR­TAL KOM­BAT”

ABOVE CEN­TRE Jus­tice LeagueTaskForce was ul­ti­mately re­spon­si­ble for the for­ma­tion of Bliz­zard.

ABOVE Di­ablo was a shot in the arm for the then-ail­ing RPG genre, thanks to its ac­tion-fo­cused game­play

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