EN­EMY ZERO

EDGE - - COLLECTED WORKS -

Devel­oper Warp Pub­lisher Sega For­mat Sega Saturn Re­lease 1995 As soon as my work on D was fin­ished, I moved to Eno’s next game, En­emy Zero. The work was gru­elling. It’s ex­tremely blurry in my mem­ory be­cause of the long days. I’d sleep at my desk ev­ery night and wouldn’t go home for days on end. I wasn’t

in­volved in gameplay or the en­gine at that stage of my ca­reer, but in terms of the cutscene cre­ation, I had to han­dle ev­ery as­pect of the cre­ative process.

To give an idea of what was in­volved, typ­i­cally, th­ese days peo­ple take sev­eral weeks just to make a sin­gle cutscene. On

En­emy Zero I was mak­ing three cutscenes a day from scratch: ev­ery­thing from the an­i­ma­tion to the light­ing. The en­tirety of the cutscenes in that game stretched to about 90 min­utes. There were just three an­i­ma­tors on the team so I made a good third of them. I had so many tasks to com­plete ev­ery sin­gle day. I was young then – in my early 20s – which is the

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