9 SIGNS YOU MAY BE MORE CUT OUT

FOR LEAD­ER­SHIP THAN YOU THINK Ush Dhanak

Elite Property Manager - - Contents -

IN­CREASED FO­CUS ON THE IM­POR­TANCE OF EMO­TIONAL IN­TEL­LI­GENCE (EQ ) in the work­place is help­ing to re­de­fine what it means to be a leader. Ush Dhanak shows how your at­ti­tude and re­ac­tion to ev­ery­day events can re­veal your true lead­er­ship po­ten­tial.

Are you un­der­es­ti­mat­ing your emo­tional in­tel­li­gence and power to lead? Have you turned down the op­por­tu­nity to in­ter­view for lead­er­ship po­si­tions be­cause you’re not ‘cut out’ to be a leader? Self-doubt is com­mon, even among very ca­pa­ble in­di­vid­u­als. We live in a world where big egos abound and it can leave many feel­ing in­ad­e­quate. But don’t al­low this to hold you up from do­ing the things you want – and that you’re re­ally good at.

An amaz­ing aca­demic back­ground, years of ex­pe­ri­ence and stel­lar per­for­mance used to prac­ti­cally guar­an­tee you a step up. To­day, though, or­gan­i­sa­tions are in­creas­ingly look­ing for lead­ers who can bal­ance emo­tional in­tel­li­gence with other tra­di­tional met­rics used to de­ter­mine lead­er­ship po­ten­tial.

The prob­lem is that there is no ‘EQme­ter’ that you can put un­der your tongue to mea­sure it. So how do you know your level?

You may, in fact, be do­ing things in ev­ery­day life that re­flect a high de­gree of emo­tional in­tel­li­gence, con­trary to what you think.

Here are nine qual­i­ties for starters that

sug­gest you’d be a bet­ter leader than you imag­ine.

1

YOU BOUNCE BACK FROM HARD KNOCKS

Ever heard any­one say, ‘I come from the school of hard knocks’?

Well, if you’ve had hard knocks in the past and al­ways bounced back, this demon­strates a re­silience that is char­ac­ter­is­tic of most lead­ers. Strong lead­ers let noth­ing stop them on the road they’re fol­low­ing – and they’ve all met fail­ure and plenty of ob­sta­cles along the way.

In fact, no one ever achieved suc­cess with­out fail­ure; it’s how you view that fail­ure and re­act to it that mat­ters.

2

YOU WORK HARD AT BUILD­ING RE­LA­TION­SHIPS

Emo­tion­ally in­tel­li­gent lead­ers know that re­la­tion­ships mat­ter above all else. That’s why they view ev­ery re­la­tion­ship as a learn­ing op­por­tu­nity and work hard to un­der­stand oth­ers, form closer bonds with them and help them grow.

You value in­put and seek to gain in­sight from oth­ers and, in the process, not only make more pop­u­lar de­ci­sions; you also cre­ate the good­will that strong re­la­tion­ships thrive on.

In­vest­ing in re­la­tion­ships like this re­duces the like­li­hood of harm­ful conflict and helps get the best out of oth­ers – im­por­tant as­pects of lead­er­ship.

3

YOU HAVE A COM­PAS­SION­ATE EAR

Do peo­ple turn to you when they have a prob­lem? That can also be a sign that you are a po­ten­tial leader – be­cause you demon­strate com­pas­sion, em­pa­thy and can lis­ten to prob­lems.

Conflicts, is­sues, per­sonal prob­lems, bad days… they’re all part of life. Lead­ers who want to brush them un­der the car­pet gen­er­ally end up los­ing the re­spect of their team mem­bers. Peo­ple hate their feel­ings be­ing ig­nored.

It’s im­por­tant in lead­er­ship to be aware of, and re­spond to, other peo­ple’s emo­tional states as it shows a deeper un­der­stand­ing of the hu­man ex­pe­ri­ence.

4

YOU KNOW YOUR­SELF AND LIVE YOUR VAL­UES

Be­ing able to be your­self and live by your val­ues is a strong sign of emo­tional in­tel­li­gence and lead­er­ship.

It shows that you un­der­stand who you are, what you stand for and what your pur­pose is. Other peo­ple nat­u­rally grav­i­tate to those who are au­then­tic, real and live with in­tegrity.

You don’t need to be a great ‘ac­tor’ to be a leader. There’s no value to be­ing ar­ti­fi­cial and you don’t need to have an ‘in­spi­ra­tional’ per­son­al­ity. If you live true to your val­ues, you will nat­u­rally in­spire oth­ers to fol­low you.

5

YOU TAKE RE­SPON­SI­BIL­ITY FOR YOUR AC­TIONS

Did you ever meet a leader who made excuses or pointed their fin­ger at oth­ers to cover their tracks?

Any strong and re­spected leader takes re­spon­si­bil­ity for their ac­tions. This is also a fea­ture of emo­tion­ally in­tel­li­gent peo­ple; be­cause they seek to un­der­stand them­selves and oth­ers, and aim to live ac­cord­ing to their val­ues, they are not scared of the truth.

Such peo­ple don’t ex­pect per­fec­tion in them­selves or oth­ers and so tend to take re­spon­si­bil­ity for what they do in ev­ery­day life – good or bad. Show­ing a lit­tle hu­man ‘fragility’ with a mis­take can even bring lead­ers closer to team mem­bers.

6

YOU SEE CHANGE AS AN OP­POR­TU­NITY

Change hap­pens. Lead­ers can pre­pare for it and em­brace it, or try to re­pel it. Most trusted lead­ers are con­fi­dent enough to see change as an op­por­tu­nity rather than a threat. Their emo­tional in­tel­li­gence gives them the self-be­lief and the flex­i­bil­ity to meet change head on – and to help their team do the same.

Your at­ti­tude to change says a lot about your lead­er­ship po­ten­tial – es­pe­cially with mil­len­ni­als, most of whom have grown up with the world chang­ing rapidly around them.

7

YOU CAN AC­CEPT NEG­A­TIVE FEED­BACK

Strong lead­ers are con­fi­dent, ma­ture and se­cure enough to be able to in­vite feed­back from oth­ers – and to ac­cept neg­a­tive feed­back in good grace.

If you can do this so­cially, it places you in good stead to take the step up as it may mean you have the emo­tional in­tel­li­gence to han­dle it in the work­place. If you feel threat­ened by crit­i­cism – maybe not.

Some­times peo­ple love to shoot you down. If you can take that on the chin, even if it’s un­fair in your eyes, it’s a very good sign that you have what it takes.

8

YOU HAN­DLE STRESS WELL

Does life throw you stress­ful sit­u­a­tions pretty of­ten? Are you a port in a storm for oth­ers in these sit­u­a­tions or does it com­pletely screw you up?

If it’s the for­mer, you have a strong lead­er­ship qual­ity that could be borne of many things – but may have emo­tional in­tel­li­gence un­der­pin­ning it.

Be­cause peo­ple with EQ adapt well to change, are aware of (and can man­age) their own emo­tions and are con­fi­dent about the path they’re on, they’re not eas­ily blown off course by the in­evitable dis­rup­tions to their plans. They see them for what they are: bumps in the road. They don’t panic and are able to stay calm and un­flus­tered.

If you stay cool in pres­sure sit­u­a­tions and are able to make mea­sured de­ci­sions when oth­ers are los­ing their heads, you may be a nat­u­ral born leader.

9

YOU EN­JOY THE COM­PANY OF OTH­ERS

“OR­GAN­I­SA­TIONS ARE LOOK­ING FOR LEAD­ERS WHO CAN BAL­ANCE EMO­TIONAL IN­TEL­LI­GENCE WITH OTHER TRA­DI­TIONAL MET­RICS.”

You are a so­cial be­ing. You en­joy the com­pany of oth­ers and love in­ter­act­ing with, hav­ing fun with and learn­ing from peo­ple. You like mak­ing oth­ers happy and try to cre­ate a wel­com­ing, fun en­vi­ron­ment.

If this sounds like you, you may have more lead­er­ship po­ten­tial than you imag­ine.

The best lead­ers work hard but also know when it’s time to play, and they en­joy do­ing that with their team. They have a sense of hu­mour and ac­tively seek breaks from the daily grind be­cause they know that peo­ple’s lives don’t re­volve around their jobs.

Have you dis­missed your­self as a leader be­cause you’re not ex­pe­ri­enced enough, don’t have the ‘num­bers on the board’ or are miss­ing the ed­u­ca­tion?

Lead­er­ship is about much more than that. Even if you’re not in­stantly nod­ding at the nine qual­i­ties de­scribed above, it doesn’t count you out. EQ is not sim­ply some­thing you’re born with and have to man­age through­out your life. Work­ing on as­pects of it can in­crease your lead­er­ship po­ten­tial.

But you may al­ready have it, de­spite your doubts! ■

Af­ter start­ing her ca­reer as a lawyer in the UK, UshDhanak turned to hu­man re­sources be­cause of her love of work­ing and in­ter­act­ing with peo­ple. She now pro­vides so­cial and emo­tional in­tel­li­gence train­ing and coach­ing to in­di­vid­u­als and teams. For more in­for­ma­tion visit ushd­hanak.com.

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