MEME TIME

ELLE (Australia) - - The Elle Manual -

At the March for Our Lives protest ear­lier this year, many teens cam­paign­ing for greater gun con­trol in the US used signs em­bla­zoned not with slo­gans call­ing for an end to the slaugh­ter of their peers, but with… Sponge­bob Squarepants memes.

It seems odd, on the sur­face, but as New York Mag­a­zine writer Madi­son Malone Kircher wrote, “[Teens] know that a sign that says #enough isn’t go­ing to get thou­sands of retweets and na­tional news at­ten­tion, but that if you put that hash­tag com­ing out of the mouth of Mr Krabs… it might.” Har­ness­ing the power of so­cial me­dia is some­thing teens were lit­er­ally born to do, and just as their protest signs are dif­fer­ent to what ours might be, so too are their In­sta feeds. Here’s what they’re into:

NICHE MEMES

HIGHLY STYLISED, CLIP ART-STYLE MEMES THAT ARE SPE­CIFIC TO THE POSTER’S LIFE LIKE: “HOW I FEEL WHEN MY MUM TELLS ME TO GET OFF MY PHONE”

STARTER PACKS

A SPE­CIFIC KIND OF NICHE MEME THAT’S TAI­LORED TO IDEN­TITY LIKE: “SO­CIAL IN­FLU­ENCER STARTER PACK,” “00’S KID STARTER PACK”

#FINSTA

FAKE IN­STA­GRAM AC­COUNT WHERE YOU SHARE YOUR REAL FEEL­INGS WITH SE­LECT FRIENDS AS OP­POSED TO: #RINSTA (REAL IN­STA­GRAM)

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