Gar­den club does lunch

Euroa Gazette - - FRONT PAGE - By GLENDA MILLER

EUROA Gar­den Club’s July an­nual lun­cheon was held at the Euroa Golf Club.

The 100 plus mem­bers and guests were de­lighted to see the sun shin­ing af­ter all the ex­tremely cold winter we have been hav­ing.

Pres­i­dent Deb wel­comed ev­ery­one, morn­ing tea was avail­able be­fore the guest speak­ers be­gan.

Many thanks to the ladies that pro­vided the beau­ti­ful flower ar­range­ments, set­ting up the ta­bles, morn­ing tea, and prizes for raf­fles.

Our first guest speaker Louisa Dunn with her hus­band Peter, (5th gen­er­a­tion farm­ers, since 1855), pro­vided a very in­for­ma­tive slide pro­jec­tion and talk on their potato grow­ing farm “Top of the Range” at North Black­wood.

There are over 4000 va­ri­eties of pota­toes in the world, and the Dunns’ grow 18 dif­fer­ent va­ri­eties on their farm.

I didn’t re­alise how much prepa­ra­tion goes into not only pre­par­ing the soil but also grad­ing the pota­toes and tak­ing into con­sid­er­a­tion the weather, frost, cock­a­toos, in­sects, fer­til­is­ing, mould, weeds also plant­ing, wa­ter­ing and tak­ing care of the pota­toes be­fore the end prod­uct is on the su­per­mar­ket shelf.

Sow­ing starts Septem­ber–Oc­to­ber, and the sea­son fin­ishes end of Au­gust the fol­low­ing year.

The Dunns’ sell their pota­toes to ma­jor Su­per­mar­kets with only 10 per cent of their pota­toes go­ing on the shelf for sale.

Louisa gave us a tip, telling us that the pota­toes that still have dirt on then, last longer as they are pro­tected from the light from send­ing them green, there for a bet­ter buy.

Our sec­ond speaker, Cathy Olive “Euroa Ar­bore­tum,” ex­plained to us that the Ar­bore­tum be­gan in 1992.

The land of 27 hectares was pre­vi­ously farm prop­erty, then trucks and ma­chin­ery were stored on some of this land when the free­way went around Euroa.

Over the years many changes have been made.

A large dam was built, much to the de­light for many fish­ing en­thu­si­asts, a 600 me­tre board­walk, ponds in the wet lands for frogs and in­sect, metal sculp­tures and na­tive nurs­ery.

They also have con­trol burn­ing off in the na­tive grass land area.

Var­i­ous ac­tiv­i­ties are held at the Ar­bore­tum e.g. fish­ing club days, but­ter­fly week, stone tool day, bush map for kin­der­garten chil­dren, school en­vi­ron­ment education, gar­den lovers series, healthy hectares for small land own­ers and na­tive plant nurs­ery.

Long hours of work go into the up­keep of the Euroa Ar­bore­tum, many thanks to all the vol­un­teers who work tire­lessly to keep it to the stan­dard it is to­day.

If you are look­ing for some­where to keep your chil­dren amused, the Ar­bore­tum is an ideal place to visit.

At the end of our lun­cheon, na­tive plants were avail­able for sale in the sun shine out­side the golf club. Thank you Cathy and Lyn. Louisa and Peter also had nu­mer­ous va­ri­eties of pota­toes on their truck for sale.

This was great as the va­ri­eties they had were dif­fer­ent than we see in the su­per­mar­ket.

Our next meet­ing is on Au­gust 18 at the Lawn Ten­nis Club. ( Daf­fodil Cup and plants to sell day).

The flow­ers for Septem­ber are the Aster and For­get-Me-Not.

The Aster comes from the Greek mean­ing “Star”.

Aster sym­bol­ism qual­i­ties faith, wis­dom, and love.

There are more than 600 dif­fer­ent species, found in Nth. Amer­ica, Europe, Asia and Sth. Amer­ica.

For­get-Me-Not is as­so­ci­ated with lov­ing re­mem­brance, and true love. An­cient Greek mean­ing “mouse ear’, re­fer­ring to the shape of the leaf. Na­tive of Europe and many species from New Zealand.

GAR­DEN­ING IN THE SUN: Mar­garet Brook, An­nette Dif­fey and Cathy Olive at­tend the Gar­den Club’s July an­nual lun­cheon at the Euroa Golf Club and are wel­comed by some beau­ti­ful weather.

DIRTY POTA­TOES LAST LONGER: Gar­den Club mem­bers were given this tip by potato grow­ers Peter and Louisa Dunn at their re­cent meet­ing and are ea­ger to pur­chase some of the un­usual va­ri­eties af­ter­wards.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.