BORED PETS

HOW TO KEEP THEM HAPPY WHEN YOU'RE NOT THERE

Fraser Coast Chronicle - - FRONT PAGE - Amy For­mosa amy.for­mosa@fraser­coastchron­i­cle.com.au

LEAV­ING your pet at home can give you the guilts, but have you ever stopped to think about the long-term ef­fects bore­dom is hav­ing on your fury friend?

We all love our pets on the Fraser Coast but the man­ager of a pop­u­lar pet sup­ply busi­ness says it’s re­ally im­por­tant to have bore­dom busters to pre­vent de­struc­tive be­hav­iour.

“If you’re at work all day and your pet doesn’t have any­thing to keep oc­cu­pied the an­i­mal will find it’s own way like dig­ging,” Mel Cox from PET stock Her­vey Bay said.

“Get­ting some­thing like a rub­ber kong with food re­wards in­side will keep your pet en­ter­tained,” she said.

It comes after Pets Train­ing & Board­ing ex­am­ined the ef­fects bore­dom can have on the life of your beloved ca­nine com­pan­ion.

Se­nior dog han­dler Kirsten Lam­bros said bored pets can be­come de­struc­tive and gain ob­ses­sive habits which can some­times be dif­fi­cult to re­verse.

“At least 50% of all dogs, un­der the age of three, are brought to our cen­tre for prob­lem­atic be­hav­iours stem­ming from bore­dom.”

Ms Lam­bros said preven­tion de­pended on the type of breed and en­ergy lev­els of your dog.

How­ever, util­is­ing a good dose of ex­er­cise, train­ing and rou­tine was im­por­tant.

“To pre­vent bore­dom, in­tro­duce hardy chew toys, a play­mate, ar­range play-dates with sim­i­lar tem­pered dogs (through a walk­ing ser­vice), take your dogs for long walks early in the day and en­gage with them at a good pace.”

PHOTO: AN­NIE PERETS

Pet­barn Her­vey Bay man­ager Mel Cox with one of the num­ber of beau­ti­ful cats await­ing adop­tion.

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