PLAYING WITH … DIRECTED FORCE RENO 2.0 PUTTER

Cost: $525. Tested by: Jimmy Emanuel, Golf Australia Writer (GA Hand­i­cap 9.4)

Golf Australia - - CONTENTS -

Are you strug­gling with the dreaded yips? This putter from Directed Force could be the so­lu­tion.

MODEL PLAYED: Directed Force Reno 2.0 with Press Grip. FIRST IMPRESSIONS: The size and unique shape of the putter head were in­stantly in­trigu­ing. As was the shaft place­ment in the head which pro­duces the Directed Force’s ‘lie an­gle bal­anc­ing’.

While I was orig­i­nally a lit­tle un­sure about such a large head and the very dif­fer­ent feel of the Press grip the black head, black shaft and black grip gave the putter an over­all stealth-like look that helped to hide the size when over the ball. And like most golfers I can get past looks in favour of per­for­mance. HOW IT PERFORMED: Be­fore I laid hands on the putter I used the com­pany’s on­line fit­ting tool where I sent a short video of my­self putting and was pro­vided with the nec­es­sary specs of the Directed Force putter I re­quired. This ex­tra step is vi­tally im­por­tant as each putter is bal­anced to a cer­tain lie an­gle to stay square dur­ing a golfer’s stroke.

Once the putter ar­rived I put it and a num­ber of other put­ters from my col­lec­tion in the com­pany’s ‘Re­vealer’. This showed how the Directed Force stayed square to my path bet­ter than any of my old favourites when mak­ing a putting stroke. Re­in­forc­ing the accuracy of my fit­ting.

Out on the course I took some time to ad­just to the speed off the face. The Directed Force seemed to come off slower than my gamer. Lead­ing me to leave putts short early. This speed dif­fer­ence was con­sis­tent which meant a sim­ple ad­just­ment was re­quired, not un­like playing on slightly slower greens, and to­wards the end of my time with the putter I found my speed was dras­ti­cally im­proved.

Where I was most im­pressed with the putter, how­ever, was from in­side of 6-feet where the Directed Force was al­most au­to­matic as the putter stayed square longer and most misses could be putt down to in­cor­rect reads.

While the wide face looks like you could never hit the ex­trem­i­ties, when in­ten­tion­ally strik­ing putts all the way in the heel and toe putts seemed to roll out sim­i­lar dis­tances to a good strike and were closer to my tar­get than with other mal­lets when do­ing the same.

The Press grip, which forces an au­to­matic for­ward press, again took some get­ting used to but when ex­per­i­ment­ing with dif­fer­ent grip tech­niques felt al­most made for claw and saw va­ri­eties. The set grip po­si­tion grip com­bined with the for­give­ness of the putter makes it a great op­tion for play­ers who strug­gle with short putts with­out giv­ing up much in the way of per­for­mance from long range.

And for any for­mer an­chor­ers or play­ers who suf­fer the dreaded yips the Directed Force is def­i­nitely worth a look.

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