How mind­ful eat­ing could be the key to weight-loss suc­cess

BE­ING MORE AT­TEN­TIVE TO WHAT YOU’RE PUTTING IN YOUR MOUTH COULD BE THE REAL KEY TO SUC­CESS IF YOU WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT. HERE’S WHY… AND HOW TO DO IT

Good Health (Australia) - - Content -

‘Mind­less eat­ing is a mod­ern-day mal­ady. Our hec­tic life­styles mean it’s all too easy to make mind­less food choices. We reach for un­healthy snacks, we don’t take proper lunch breaks and we’re dis­tracted while we eat’

Ever munched your way through a box of pop­corn at the cin­ema when you weren’t even hun­gry? De­voured din­ner in front of the TV with­out re­ally tast­ing it? So many of us down that snack while check­ing emails or log onto Face­book over a cuppa and a bis­cuit… or two.

‘Mind­less eat­ing’ is all about be­ing hardly aware of how much or even what you’re eat­ing; and chances are you’re putting on weight be­cause of it.

You’re def­i­nitely not alone in your eat­ing-on-au­to­matic-pi­lot habits.

“Mind­less eat­ing is a mod­ern-day mal­ady,” says Rachel Bartholomew, nu­tri­tional con­sul­tant and co-au­thor with psy­chol­ogy coach Mandy Pear­son of

Mind­ful Eat­ing. “Our hec­tic life­styles mean it’s all too easy to make mind­less food choices. We reach for un­healthy snacks for a quick en­ergy boost, we don’t take proper lunch breaks and we’re con­stantly dis­tracted while we eat.”

This not only takes away the en­joy­ment of food, but it can lead to neg­a­tive habits, such as overeat­ing, yo-yo di­et­ing and weight gain.

“Eat­ing mind­lessly means we pay lit­tle at­ten­tion to the rich ex­pe­ri­ence of eat­ing and be­come dis­en­gaged from it,” says mind­ful­ness teacher and au­thor of A Year of Liv­ing Mind­fully, Anna Black. “We’re eat­ing quickly, and while we’re dis­tracted, we’re less likely to pick up the phys­i­cal cues that we’re full, and so we eat too much.” The good news is you can break free from these bad habits and learn to ap­pre­ci­ate food (and be in con­trol of it) sim­ply by en­gag­ing your mind and turn­ing to the an­cient Bud­dhist prac­tice of mind­ful­ness. “Be­ing mind­ful is about liv­ing in the present and pay­ing at­ten­tion to ev­ery­day ex­pe­ri­ences – whether a walk in the park or re­lax­ing in a bath,” says Pear­son. “You can ap­ply these prin­ci­ples to your eat­ing habits. When you’re fully present in your eat­ing – tast­ing and savour­ing ev­ery mouth­ful – you’re in con­trol. When you’re in con­trol you start to re­alise you have a choice. When you re­alise you have a choice, you can choose to change your eat­ing habits.” Mind­ful eat­ing is about con­nect­ing with food and tun­ing in to what your body needs, so you’ll eat fewer of the bad things and fill up on nour­ish­ing food in­stead. “It’s about cre­at­ing a healthy bal­ance you’re in con­trol of and feel great about,” says Pear­son. “It’s about em­brac­ing the whole idea of food as some­thing to linger over and to en­joy pre­par­ing and cook­ing, fall­ing in love with food again.”

‘It’s about em­brac­ing the idea of food as some­thing to linger over’

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.