Eat two to three gar­lic cloves per day for ther­a­peu­tic ef­fects.

Good Health (Australia) - - Be Informed -

DRINK UP

Hav­ing plenty of flu­ids is one of the most im­por­tant things you can do when you have a cold or flu. Symp­toms like a runny nose and the sweat­ing that of­ten ac­com­pa­nies fever in­crease the amount of water your body loses and you could be at risk of de­hy­dra­tion if you don’t up your fluid in­take. Stay­ing hy­drated also helps to loosen mu­cus in the nose and chest and re­lieve con­ges­tion.

WHEN DO YOU NEED TO SEE A DOC­TOR?

If you’re gen­er­ally in good health, you’re un­likely to need to see a doc­tor.

But if symp­toms are se­vere, pro­longed or un­usual, or you’re vul­ner­a­ble to com­pli­ca­tions (in the case of lung con­di­tions or a sup­pressed im­mune sys­tem) don’t hes­i­tate to see a GP. They can also lis­ten to your chest to en­sure your cough is noth­ing to worry about and pass on symp­tom-re­liev­ing ideas.

USE ES­SEN­TIAL OILS

Cer­tain oils have anti-vi­ral, an­ti­sep­tic, ex­pec­to­rant, mu­cus­re­liev­ing, or im­mune-boost­ing ac­tion. Use a dif­fuser and put in a cou­ple of drops each of some or all of these oils: lemon, thyme, tea tree and eu­ca­lyp­tus. You can also put a drop or two of these oils in 1 tbsp co­conut oil and rub on your chest for symp­tom re­lief. Al­ways test on your hand first to check for re­ac­tions be­fore you ap­ply else­where. If un­sure, use a dif­fuser.

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