KNOW YOUR CUTS

CHOOS­ING THE PER­FECT EN­GAGE­MENT RING STARTS WITH FIND­ING THE RIGHT CUT. HERE’S OUR GUIDE TO THE KEY STONE STYLES.

GQ (Australia) - - THE GQ GROOM GUIDE -

EMER­ALD

It was hugely pop­u­lar dur­ing the Art Deco move­ment, when its par­al­lel lines and un­clut­tered ap­pear­ance com­ple­mented the de­signs of the time. Even now, it re­mains a time­less, el­e­gant cut that em­pha­sises a diamond’s clar­ity and colour.

ROUND BRIL­LIANT

This style ac­counts for about three-quar­ters of all di­a­monds sold – and it’s easy to see why. The an­gle of ev­ery facet has been cal­cu­lated to re­flect the most light, which cre­ates a daz­zling ef­fect with even the slight­est move­ment.

LU­CIDA

Mean­ing the bright­est star in a con­stel­la­tion, the Lu­cida cut was frst in­tro­duced by Tif­fany & Co. back in 1999, af­ter decades of de­vel­op­ment. It re­mains pop­u­lar to­day, and is avail­able in square and rec­tan­gu­lar styles, both of which make for a stun­ning look.

OVAL

In­vented in the early 1960s, it is made us­ing a cut very sim­i­lar to the round bril­liant and cre­ates a stone of re­mark­able beauty, fre and scin­til­la­tion.

PEAR

A very flat­ter­ing diamond in the shape of a wa­ter drop, with a sweep­ing curve that ta­pers to a fne point. The pear-cut diamond is unique and im­pres­sive, with­out be­ing os­ten­ta­tious.

PRINCESS

With its sharp, un­cut corners, unique faceting style and clean lines, this is the sec­ond-most pop­u­lar cut of diamond.

ASS­CHER

Es­sen­tially an emer­ald cut in square form, but with a stronger geo­met­ric look, it’s a cool, ca­sual style of diamond. It has bright, ex­pan­sive facets, thanks to the stepped cut­ting style.

HEART

A grace­ful, ro­man­tic cut – a heart-shaped diamond makes an el­e­gant al­ter­na­tive to a round bril­liant cut.

CUSH­ION

Typ­i­cally a square-shaped diamond with rounded corners, this style has been around for at least 200 years. While the clas­sic ver­sion is usu­ally square, cush­ion­cut di­a­monds can also be found in slightly rec­tan­gu­lar shapes.

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