HOW TO SMUG­GLE FRIENDS INTO NORTH KOREA

GQ (Australia) - - FOUR -

The Her­mit King­dom may have out­lawed dig­i­tal con­tra­band like western movies and TV shows, but in­for­ma­tion ac­tivists have found plenty of ways to get data into the coun­try.

Trucks

Stash USB sticks and SD cards in Chi­nese cargo trucks that legally haul sup­plies across the Chi­nese/ North Korean bor­der.

Tyres

Crawl un­der a bor­der fence, walk into the Tu­men River, and throw tyres strapped with pack­ages of USB drives to­ward the op­po­site bank. Hope that a lucky passer-by picks up the dig­i­tal loot and sells or shares it.

Bal­loons

Launch bal­loons with a timer and chem­i­cal fuse set to re­lease po­lit­i­cal pam­phlets, dol­lars, and USB drives once they’re over the bor­der.

Boats

Pass ma­te­rial from tourist boats to North Korean fish­er­men who are sym­pa­thetic to the cause, dis­guis­ing the trans­ac­tion as an in­no­cent pur­chase of the day’s catch.

Hand-offs

Ar­range a meet up via walkie-talkie on the banks of the Tu­men River. Bribe bor­der guards on both sides lib­er­ally. The smug­gler wades or swims across to grab the goods.

Buck­ets

Throw a rock tied to the end of a rope across the river. Smug­glers on the op­po­site side then reel in a plas­tic-wrapped bucket of con­tra­band.

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