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GQ (Australia) - - NEWS -

AU­THEN­TIC­ITY IS KEY – THOUGH IT’S NOT AL­WAYS THE CASE WHEN HOL­LY­WOOD MATCHES ITS MEN WITH MOVE­MENTS.

Here at GQ we talk a lot about the im­por­tance of the right watch for the right man at the right time. And you only need look at the painstak­ing ef­forts made in movies to match time­piece to char­ac­ter – and the ap­palling re­sults when they are mis­aligned – to con­frm the im­por­tance of such. Con­sider the case of James Bond. His watch in the frst ever Dr. No was a Rolex ‘Sub­mariner’ on a striped can­vas strap. This ap­peared at a time when NATO straps were largely only the pre­serve of sol­diers. So. Damn. Cool. And it was proof that a lot of thought went into watches on flm long be­fore mar­keters and brands dis­cov­ered the power of prod­uct-place­ment and brand align­ment. Sean Con­nery’s wrist­watch, in a movie of this vintage, spoke of Bond’s style and per­son­al­ity – the non-oem (in-house) strap says that he’s an in­di­vid­ual; the mil­i­tary ref­er­ence de­liv­er­ing a glimpse of his badass pedi­gree. That it was a Rolex, mean­while, only con­frmed his re­quire­ment for the best of ev­ery­thing. A more re­cent and cau­tion­ary tale came into view with Argo, where Ben Af­feck sported a Rolex ‘Deepsea Sea-dweller’. Prob­lem be­ing that the flm was set in 1980 and the watch was in­tro­duced in 2008. Ouch. So, gents – be sure to get it right, and let these movies act as a guide to great­ness.

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