BYE BYE GYM FA­TIGUE

GQ (Australia) - - NEWSGQUINE -

AF­TER BLOW­ING UP IN THE US, ONE-FEE GYM PASS MEM­BER­SHIPS HAVE AR­RIVED DOWN UN­DER, AND MIGHT JUST BE THE AN­SWER TO ALL WORK­OUT WOES.

There are plenty of rea­sons to avoid the gym. Those hope­lessly tan­gled head­phones in your bag, that dude grunt­ing his way through a squat set, that friend tex­ting screen grabs of his Tin­der crush. But the real prob­lem is bore­dom. Lis­ten to the Bales, Hemsworths and Gyl­len­haals – men who’ve bulked up rapidly for flm roles – and they’ll ut­ter the same mantra: to stay mo­ti­vated, it’s es­sen­tial to hit the body from dif­fer­ent an­gles. Va­ri­ety is ev­ery­thing, so shouldn’t a gym pass re­flect that? A ris­ing num­ber of Aussie start-ups cer­tainly think so. Com­pa­nies like Bodypass, Yo­ga­pass and Sweatpass are tout­ing them­selves as the an­ti­dote to dip-in, dip-out ft­ness binges. It’s Net­flix for the body – a monthly flat fee al­low­ing ac­cess to classes and pro­grams from a huge range of gyms, stu­dios and ac­tiv­ity providers. Crossfit in the morn­ing, yoga by night? Sure. And for those with an affnity for the out­doors, there’s also pad­dle­board­ing and rock-climb­ing. “More re­search is point­ing to the benefts of vary­ing ex­er­cise, hav­ing fun while ex­er­cis­ing and in­cor­po­rat­ing ft­ness into your life as more of an ev­ery­day ap­proach rather than an eight-week pro­gram or monthly chal­lenge,” says Ge­or­gia van Tiel, a co-founder of Bodypass, which charges mem­bers $99 a month. It’s hard to fault the va­ri­ety on of­fer. If hit­ting a spin class on car­dio day doesn’t ap­peal, pro­grams like Bodypass al­low the flex­i­bil­ity to go for a swim, play squash or take a box­ing ses­sion in­stead. “I per­son­ally feld two or three phone calls per week from com­pa­nies who have jumped on the trend,” says Bondi-based per­sonal trainer Scott Good­ing. “It’s a model that has worked well in the States.” Good­ing’s not wrong. US start-up Classpass is cred­ited with cre­at­ing the phe­nom­e­non – since it was founded in 2013, it’s grown to be worth more than half a bil­lion dol­lars. “It won’t suit ev­ery­one,” says Good­ing, “but it cer­tainly helps to elim­i­nate the risk of stal­e­ness – which is a ma­jor fac­tor in ex­er­cise ad­her­ence at the mo­ment.”

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