an­other world

A WATCH FOR TRUE HIGH FLY­ERS, THE PATEK PHILIPPE ‘WORLD TIME CHRONO­GRAPH’ IS THE NEW GOLD STAN­DARD FOR OVER­SEAS TRAVEL .

GQ (Australia) - - GQ WATCH -

While the high-end watch in­dus­try isn’t as fast-paced as the world of fash­ion, watch­mak­ers are con­stantly un­der pres­sure to rein­vent their me­chan­i­cal wares so that they seem novel and note­wor­thy. An­niver­saries have be­come an im­por­tant tool in breath­ing new life into ex­ist­ing col­lec­tions – noth­ing beats a birth­day for a spot of self-cel­e­bra­tion. So it was sur­pris­ing that Patek Philippe chose not to honour the 40th an­niver­sary of its most recog­nis­able watch, the ‘Nau­tilus’, at this year’s Basel­world. In the ab­sence of any new ‘Nau­tilus’, the ref­er­ence ‘5930G’, or ‘World Time Chrono­graph’, has be­come Patek’s pro­tag­o­nist of the year. When it comes to world-timers, Patek Philippe is one of the big boys, the brand one of the first to adopt the orig­i­nal world time move­ment in­vented in 1935 by Louis Cot­tier. Since then, Patek has prac­ti­cally de­fined the way a world-timer looks, patent­ing two im­por­tant in-house cal­i­bres in 1959 and 2000. More than that, the ‘5930G’ also in­cor­po­rates a chrono­graph func­tion – mak­ing it only the sec­ond time the brand has merged a stop­watch with a world-timer. The other ex­am­ple was cus­tom­made in 1940 and sits in the Patek Philippe mu­seum in Geneva. At 39.5mm wide, and about 12mm tall, the white gold ‘5930G’ is in­cred­i­bly com­pact for a world-timer chrono­graph. Its tremen­dously in­dus­tri­ous dial dis­plays the time in 24 time zones, while its self-wind­ing move­ment de­liv­ers a min­i­mum 50hour power re­serve, should you ever deign to take it off. As for the ‘Nau­tilus’? In­dus­try ru­mours sug­gest an up­dated ex­am­ple will be with us by the end of the year. jfar­ren­price.com.au; patek.com

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