JUSTDESSERTS

GQ (Australia) - - TASTE & TRAVEL -

THE NAME MAY CON­JURE IM­AGES OF OLD LADIES DOWN­ING SHERRY, BUT IT’S TIME TO RE­CON­SIDER DESSERT WINE. NOT ONLY ARE THESE COM­PLEX IN FLAVOUR, BUT THEY ARE THE PERFECT WAY TO END A MEAL OR A WARM SUM­MER’S DAY. OR ANY DAY, FOR THAT MAT­TER. HERE’S WHAT ELSE YOU NEED TO KNOW. VA­RI­ETIES

There are many dif­fer­ent types of dessert wine, but some key ones in­clude for­ti­fied wine (sherry and port), ice wine (made with frozen grapes), and noble rot wine. The name refers to a fun­gus called Botry­tis cinerea, which re­moves wa­ter from the grapes and con­cen­trates the su­gar – re­sult­ing in some of the most pres­ti­gious dessert wines out there.

HOW TO SERVE

Since they typ­i­cally pack more al­co­hol than tra­di­tional wines, don’t be too heavy-handed. Dessert wines are best served in a small tulip-shaped glass – or a white wine glass, if des­per­ate – and a third of a glass is plenty. White styles are gen­er­ally chilled, while reds can be served at just be­low room tem­per­a­ture.

OUR PICK

De Bor­toli Noble One Botry­tis Semil­lon. This award-win­ning noble rot wine boasts apri­cot, peach, cit­rus and oak flavours. It can be cel­lared for up to 10-15 years, or en­joyed im­me­di­ately with soft cheeses or desserts. $33 (375ml); de­bor­toli.com.au

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.