CREATIVE SPACE

AS A NEW MAD MEN RETROSPECTIVE LOOKS BACK ON ONE OF TV’S GREAT­EST SHOWS, TAKE STYLE CUES FROM DON DRAPER’S STERLING COOPER OFFICES, GIVING YOUR WORKSPACE AN UPGRADE WITH THESE KEY PIECES.

GQ (Australia) - - THESOURCE -

1. ‘Artist Stripe’ ball­point pen col­lec­tion, $500, by Caran D’ache + Paul Smith. 2. Teak Dan­ish writ­ing desk, $3950, by Modern Times. 3. ‘Stella’ ta­ble lamp, $4040, by Spence & Lyda. 4. ‘Bent­wood’ of­fice chair, $549, by West Elm. 5. ‘Sixth Av­enue’ mag­a­zine holder, $395, by Coco Repub­lic. 6. Brass ‘Cog’ desk tidy, £200, by Tom Dixon. 7. Wal­nut side­board, $10,950, by Arne Vod­der at Great Dane. 8. Leather Backgam­mon set, £425, by Hec­tor Saxe at Mr Porter. 9. Brass ‘Xanax’ box, $148, by Jonathan Adler. 10. Mad Men by Matthew Weiner, £135, Taschen.

Con­tin­ued from p27. It de­liv­ers a col­lec­tion of chilled-out, so­phis­ti­cated sounds and rhymes laced with nos­tal­gia, fam­ily val­ues and po­etry. “I started po­etry when I was young,” ex­plains Coyle-larner, his speech soft and fast. “Rap­ping came off the back of that. A lot of peo­ple did it at school, some left it be­hind, I got stuck with it.” Coyle-larner cred­its his drama school back­ground and mother for his love of lan­guage. “I love the way Shake­speare used words. It’s some­thing I get from Mum,” he says. “She was into act­ing and words, and how they can be put to­gether to move peo­ple in ways that I can’t be ex­plained, re­ally.” A ma­jor part of the Loyle-carner story stems from the artist’s ADHD and dyslexic di­ag­no­sis, from be­ing the mis­un­der­stood kid to deal­ing with that through creative writ­ing, to his cur­rent side-hus­tle, run­ning cook­ing classes for kids with ADHD out of a Lon­don kitchen. “Be­ing dyslexic, I strug­gled with writ­ing crit­i­cally, but I could al­ways write cre­atively,” he says. “With creative writ­ing, you’re not judged as much on spell­ing or form or struc­ture; any mis­takes al­most add to the poem. It was kind of my lit­tle place where I could get away and colour out­side the lines.” Yes­ter­day’s Gone paints a full por­trait of the artist. He talks about life and fam­ily, with his mother mak­ing a spo­ken-word cameo. To him, it sounds like home, his rhymes fo­cus­ing on vul­ner­a­bil­ity over bravado. “It’s a snap­shot of what it’s like be 20 in Lon­don; the de­pres­sors, the pos­i­tives, the neg­a­tives,” he ex­plains. “[When I started out] I was mak­ing mu­sic for my­self and for friends who would lis­ten to it. They know me and know what I’m liv­ing for. It was nowhere near the kind of Great Gatsby life­style peo­ple as­sume you have as a rap­per. A lot of my favourite records are by artists such as Mos Def, who have shown that it’s OK to open up. To be honest, there was never re­ally a mo­ment where I wanted to write any other way.” Yes­ter­day’s Gone is out Jan­uary 20

WRITTEN BY MAD MEN CRE­ATOR MATTHEW WEINER, THIS NEW BOOK FEA­TURES ON-SET PHO­TO­GRAPHS, COSTUMES AND NOTES FROM THE WRIT­ERS’ ROOM. MID-CENTURY MODERN FURNITURE FO­CUSES ON FUNCTIONALITY, WITH CLEAN, SLEEK LINES, A MIX OF OR­GANIC AND GEOMETRIC FORMS AND A RANGE OF MA­TE­RI­ALS AND COLOURS.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.