VR & AR through Google’s eyes

CLAY BAVOR, GOOGLE VICE PRES­I­DENT OF VR & AR, ON WHAT THE FU­TURE LOOKS LIKE.

GQ (Australia) - - FIT - vr.google.com/day­dream Read the full in­ter­view ongq.com.au

“At Google, we see vir­tual and aug­mented re­al­ity as an im­por­tant part of the next phase of our mis­sion to or­gan­ise the world’s in­for­ma­tion. VR can put you any­where, AR can bring any­thing to you; VR can trans­port you some­where else, AR leaves you where you are and brings ob­jects and in­for­ma­tion to you, in con­text, mak­ing them seem like they’re there with you. And I see both as be­ing tremen­dously ad­di­tive to the hu­man ex­pe­ri­ence – not re­plac­ing it. By en­abling peo­ple to in­stantly ‘travel’ to any­where, we’ll be able to taste many more of the in­ter­est­ing events and places on our planet. And for most, the re­sponse to vis­it­ing a place vir­tu­ally won’t be, ‘Great, now I don’t have to go.’ It will be, ‘Now I’m cu­ri­ous. I want to go.’ Be­cause un­der­stand­ing some­thing leads to car­ing and en­gage­ment. “2016 was a big year for VR and AR – new VR hard­ware for con­sumers came to mar­ket, from smart­phone-pow­ered op­tions to desk­top­pow­ered sys­tems. We launched Day­dream, our plat­form for high qual­ity mo­bile VR, and de­vel­op­ers started ex­plor­ing AR in earnest, as the first de­vices to build on be­came avail­able. “And there’s great po­ten­tial for VR and MR [mixed re­al­ity] to pos­i­tively im­pact health and well­be­ing. You can imag­ine ex­er­cise rou­tines that are made more fun, and pro­duc­tive. For in­stance, imag­ine rid­ing a sta­tion­ary bike for ex­er­cise, but with VR, hav­ing the feel­ing of rid­ing through the Alps, as part of the Tour de France.”

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