VISIONARY STA­TUS

GQ TEAMS UP WITH SYDNEYBASED NGO I-MANIFEST TO UNEARTH THE ROOTS OF CREATIVIT Y THAT DRIVE THIS TR IO OF I NDUSTRY LEAD­ERS.

GQ (Australia) - - WATCH - For ex­clu­sive videos of each visionary,go­togq.com.au

There’s some­thing in every one of us that strives to be a visionary, ‘a per­son with orig­i­nal ideas about what the fu­ture will or could be like’. In what­ever field it is we work, most pos­sess the be­lief that the ca­pac­ity is there, some­where – wait­ing to be ful­filled. Joanna Pre­t­y­man is one of those peo­ple. She’s the founder of I-manifest, a non-gov­ern­men­tal, not-for-profit or­gan­i­sa­tion that uses cre­ativ­ity to em­power youth to find their pas­sion and live their pur­pose. And with the help of GQ, I-manifest has pro­filed some of Sydney’s most suc­cess­ful mod­ern-day tal­ents, from the Flight Fa­cil­i­ties guys who are head­ing to­wards the peak of their ca­reers, to the more es­tab­lished and sea­soned wise men in tai­lor Roger Shamoun and restau­ra­teur Maurice Terzini. The aim – to help in­spire the young, the vi­sion­ar­ies of to­mor­row, with Pre­t­y­man adding, “I se­lected these men as our vi­sion­ar­ies be­cause to me they em­body the en­ergy of what I-manifest is teach­ing our youth. That is, to live your pas­sion, your truth. To be brave and take risks. To keep go­ing even in the face of ad­ver­sity. To value fam­ily, what­ever that looks like for you. To draw on your her­itage and write your own script to this life. And to believe in your­self no mat­ter what. We were hon­oured to bring this cam­paign to life for Ray­mond Weil as a brand who also up­holds these val­ues of fam­ily, her­itage, crafts­man­ship with in­tegrity.” i-manifest.org; ray­mond-weil.com

1

A lively duo with an in­nate abil­ity to embrace life through live mu­sic and ex­pe­ri­ences, Hugo and Jimmy are one of Aus­tralia’s great­est global ex­ports in the mu­sic world. Hits like ‘Crave You’ have brought them suc­cess. Their se­cret? To pur­sue their pas­sion while still main­tain­ing their own in­di­vid­u­al­ity. The best thing about your pro­fes­sion and life­style? The best things can also be con­sid­ered the worst. We get to go to some amaz­ing des­ti­na­tions on the other side of the world and play to a whole bunch of ex­cited strangers, who have some­how dis­cov­ered our mu­sic. What is the most im­por­tant char­ac­ter­is­tic to fu­elling cre­ativ­ity? Stay­ing busy. It’s as sim­ple as that. No mat­ter where you go, it’s easy to be ex­posed to mu­sic, so some­times these chance en­coun­ters with a new song, or a re­minder of an old one, can be an in­spi­ra­tion to cre­ate some­thing new. Why is hav­ing fun and en­joy­ing your­self often seen as friv­o­lous? Be­cause peo­ple rarely make a liv­ing from hav­ing fun. So the as­sump­tion is that you’re wast­ing your time. John Len­non tack­led that issue best: “Time you en­joyed wast­ing, isn’t wasted time”. You have to avoid be­ing too held down by guilt, as we’ve found some­times forc­ing the cre­ativ­ity can stunt it. De­scribe a visionary. They’re the trail­blaz­ers, the ones not con­tent in fol­low­ing the crowd, and more will­ing to ex­press them­selves ei­ther in their ac­tions, or speak­ing our about how they believe things should be. Who is a liv­ing visionary? Daft Punk. Every album they’ve re­leased has pre­dated the change in sound by four years or more. You could go as far back as their de­but album Home­work and see that some of the mu­sic then is just as rel­e­vant now as it was then.

2

A self-taught tai­lor, Shamoun has a pen­chant for risk-tak­ing and big dreams. He’s made a busi­ness from pulling apart the tai­lor­ing rule­book and recre­at­ing his own styles. How much can fam­ily her­itage and legacy help in be­com­ing a visionary? Her­itage and legacy lay the foundation. It doesn’t nec­es­sar­ily cor­re­late to a vi­sion. Believ­ing in your­self and rolling up your sleeves are the great­est as­sets – any­one can at­tain them. How im­por­tant is tak­ing risks? Cross­ing the road dur­ing peak hour traf­fic and cross­ing that same road dur­ing the qui­etest time of the day, are to­tally dif­fer­ent risks. Even though you’re still cross­ing the road, it’s the process and thought that changes the dy­namic. Be­ing pre­pared, de­vel­op­ing ex­pe­ri­ence, sharp­en­ing your skillset, think­ing things through are all ra­tio­nal pro­cesses that work to min­imise risk, but your gut is the ul­ti­mate test. Never ques­tion your gut. What in­spires cre­ativ­ity in some­one, or is it in­nate? I believe it all starts in the home. Par­ents are the largest con­trib­u­tor to the mur­der of a child’s cre­ative in­hi­bi­tions. The word ‘no’ is thrown around without much thought of its con­se­quence. I believe ev­ery­one is cre­ative, it’s only the fear that sup­presses a per­son from ex­press­ing it. There’s a fine line be­tween con­fi­dence and delu­sion. What does a well-tai­lored suit say about a man? In to­day’s day and age, it says a lot. In a time where ev­ery­thing’s so fast and dis­trac­tion is so preva­lent, mak­ing the time to learn about the craft and in­vest the money, speaks vol­umes. De­scribe a visionary. A visionary sees the fu­ture no mat­ter how the present may seem. A visionary cre­ates from in­spi­ra­tion, from feel­ing from the gut. A visionary stands alone, with an army as his shadow... fear­less. Who is a liv­ing visionary? Fer­nando Botero. I first saw his work when I was 14 and he changed my per­spec­tive on ev­ery­thing. I con­trib­ute a lot of my cre­ativ­ity and out-of-the­box think­ing to him.

3

A sim­ple but re­fined tastemaker and a man who sees things holis­ti­cally, Terzini is a lov­ing fa­ther and owner of some of Sydney’s most iconic din­ing spots. He’s also a cre­ator of as­pi­ra­tional cloth­ing, his fash­ion la­bel 10 Pieces showing as it did at Pitti Uomo this year. If you had one bit of ad­vice to im­part on the next gen­er­a­tion of de­sign­ers, what would it be? Well, since I never re­ally stud­ied de­sign, and it’s re­ally just been by de­fault and de­ter­mi­na­tion to achieve some­thing out­side of my field of ex­per­tise, the ad­vice I would give is if truly believe you can achieve, de­sign, cre­ate don’t ever give up. What is your most im­por­tant trait? Hard work, but prob­a­bly more im­por­tant than that these days is the abil­ity to se­lect the right team around me that can in­spire me and re­mind me you never stop learn­ing. How clothes can and you ma­te­ri­alin­spire through val­ues? I find beau­ti­fully de­signed clothes in­spir­ing... they are you, you are them – you wear them, they be­come part of your per­son­al­ity... it’s the peo­ple that are in­spir­ing. De­scribe Some­one a that visionary. cre­ates beauty that af­fects oth­ers, or work that makes peo­ple sit up and take no­tice; some­one with a voice, it can be in any field from pol­i­tics to art; some­one that lives their life to the fullest; some­one who leaves a legacy.

FLIGHT FACILITI ES’ HUGO GRUZMAN AND JIMMY LYELL, ELEC­TRONIC PRODUCERS

MAURICE TERZINI, RESTAU­RA­TEUR ROGER SHAMOUN, ZIMMA TAILORS

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