EX­AM­PLE BLUESY FU­SION SOLO

Guitar Techniques - - Lesson: Session -

[ Solo 1: Bars 17- 20] these are stan­dard g mi­nor pen­ta­tonic- based phrases. make sure the bend from the b7 note ( F) to the root ( g) is ac­cu­rately pitched, and note the quar­ter- tone bends ( known as blues ‘ curls’), as these are the kind of idio­syn­cratic tech­niques that make the ‘ blues’ sound. [ Bars 21- 24] the first bar of this sec­tion is an­other typ­i­cal bluesy lick, but moves into a C mixoly­dian ( C D E F g A Bb) mode- based line over the C7 chord in bar 22. this is the first of our mo­dal, non- pen­ta­tonic ap­proaches, and works be­cause the notes of the C7 chord live in that scale ( C E g Bb). In bar 23, the same mixoly­dian idea is used over the Bb7 chord, but this time, Bb mixoly­dian is used ( Bb C D Eb F g Ab). this lit­tle lick can be tech­ni­cally chal­leng­ing to pick, as it as­cends the scale in 3rds, so check that your al­ter­nate pick­ing is ac­cu­rate. Bar 24 uses a rhyth­mi­cal A mi­nor pen­ta­tonic ( A C D E g) lick over the Bm7b5 and E7# 9 chords. this chord pro­gres­sion is known as a ‘ mi­nor II V’, and works as our mod­u­la­tion to our new key of A. [ Solo 2: Bars 25 and 26] Now in A, our first lick is based in the A mi­nor blues scale ( A C D Eb E g), and uses a cou­ple of tricky, rapid fret­ting- hand slides that might take time to mas­ter. prac­tise slowly to make sure you get these in time. [ Bars 27 and 28] Start­ing with an A mi­nor pen­ta­tonic- based lick over the A7 chord, the fol­low­ing chords of Bm7b5 and E7# 9 in bar 28 ( our mi­nor II V in Am) give us a jazz- style pro­gres­sion to play over. Start­ing with a B locrian- based phrase over the Bm7b5 ( the notes of that chord, B D F A, live in the B locrian mode: B C D E F g A), the jazzy mode of E phry­gian dom­i­nant ( E F g# A B C D) is the ba­sis of the lick played over the E7# 9 ( the notes of the E7 chord, E g# B D, live in that scale). Note how the lick ends by chro­mat­i­cally de­scend­ing from the b7 ( D) to the # 5/ b13 ( C), cre­at­ing a very jazzy ‘ al­tered’, tense sound. [ Bars 29- 32] Al­though the first two bars here are quite sim­ple, the note choices and their place­ment show how notes that can fit in the ma­jor or mi­nor pen­ta­tonic can be played in a per­haps non- bluesy way. the lick in bar 31, over the C7 chord, has a sweep- picked F ma­jor triad ( F A C) at the

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