Ex­am­ple 5 ID­IOMATIC HAR­MON­I­SA­TION IN four PARTS I IV V7 I PRO­GRES­SION

Guitar Techniques - - Play: Theory -

Let’s see how a C-F-G7-C (I IV V7 I) se­quence might look on the guitar. The first ex­am­ple shows the bot­tom four notes of a barre-chord. How­ever, this vi­o­lates sev­eral of our prin­ci­ples: the top two voices drop below their ac­cept­able limit (so they’re 2 xxxxxxxxxx un­singable), the leaps are large, and in the same di­rec­tion for the last three chords. Plus two voices move in the same di­rec­tion in oc­taves (and 5ths), which sab­o­tages their in­de­pen­dence. The lead­ing tone in the third chord is not re­solved by the same voice, and the sub­dom­i­nant re­solves to the me­di­ant in a dif­fer­ent voice and oc­tave, mak­ing it mu­si­cally il­log­i­cal. Bar 2 shows the same se­quence, but ren­dered more clas­si­cally. Each voice is in its range, with a larger in­ter­val from Bass to Tenor than be­tween other voices. Voices move min­i­mally and sound in­de­pen­dent. Ten­dency tones re­solve as ex­pected. Sing each one and you can see how the se­quence com­prises four sim­ple and singable lines.

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