DUSTY END

Guitar Techniques - - TALK BACK - Si Farmer

Your com­ments def­i­nitely res­onate with me and I’d bet loads of other read­ers, Si. It’s a con­fi­dence thing, I think: if you feel un­sure of any area of the neck – like the bot­tom three strings or, in­deed, above the 12th fret – you won’t feel com­fort­able there. Larry Carl­ton says he learns ev­ery lick or triad, in ev­ery po­si­tion on the fret­board, in­clud­ing above the 12th fret on the low­est three strings. If we all did that, we’d in­crease our po­ten­tial – and our con­fi­dence at play­ing in these ‘dusty’ ar­eas – hugely. Glad you en­joyed the fea­ture.

Thanks for the Above The 12th Fret fea­ture (GT258). I’d al­ways used the dusty end as a ‘last re­sort’ in my play­ing. I’d get to­wards the cli­max of a solo and think, ‘I should go up an oc­tave now, but I’ll only play the same old licks 12 frets up’. And that de­terred me from want­ing to do so. It had never oc­curred to me to use the smaller fret spa­ces to their ad­van­tage, and your ar­ti­cle gave me heaps of ideas to be get­ting on with. I don’t usu­ally do tap­ping, but a cou­ple of those licks made me smile – and raised an eye­brow or two from the other gui­tarist in my band. He wants the mag now, too - but he can buy his own! Thanks, guys.

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