BLUES

Pink Floyd’s gui­tarist’s style is melodic, taste­ful and brims with feel­ing, but al­ways un­der­pinned by a blues sen­si­bil­ity, says Les David­son.

Guitar Techniques - - CONTENTS -

Les David­son brings you two full so­los in the style of Pink Floyd’s David Gil­mour.

USU­ALLY IN THE STU­DIO IT’S THE FIRST TAKE THAT YOU KEEP BE­CAUSE AF­TER THAT YOU JUST START TO RE­PEAT YOUR­SELF David Gil­mour

This gi­ant of rock hardly needs in­tro­duc­ing. Since re­plac­ing Syd Bar­rett in Pink Floyd in 1968, Gil­mour has carved his place in mu­si­cal his­tory as the self-ap­pointed leader of Floyd who led the band to sta­dium suc­cess with al­bums in­clud­ing Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were You Here and The Wall.

Born in 1946 in Cam­bridge, by the age of 10 David had dis­cov­ered his in­ter­est in mu­sic via Bill Ha­ley and Elvis Pres­ley, both of whom in­spired him to bor­row a neigh­bour’s gui­tar, which in­ci­den­tally he never re­turned. He has said that blues gi­ant Lead­belly, folk fig­ure­head Woody Guthrie and Shad­ows gui­tarist Hank Marvin were all big in­flu­ences on his early play­ing.

David went to the same school as orig­i­nal Pink Floyd gui­tarist, Syd Bar­rett. They be­came friends and started to make mu­sic to­gether. Roger Waters went to an­other lo­cal school. It came as no sur­prise that af­ter Syd Bar­rett left Pink Floyd, David neatly stepped into his shoes on six-string du­ties.

David Gil­mour has al­ways had an un­der­ly­ing blues feel and note choice no mat­ter what style of mu­sic he has played, so he has rightly earned his place in this col­umn. He has al­ways and con­tin­ues to com­mand re­spect amongst his fel­low mu­si­cians: Kate Bush, Paul McCart­ney, John Mar­tyn, Eric Clap­ton, BB King, Bob Dy­lan, Pete Town­shend are just some of the peo­ple who have asked David to add his play­ing to ei­ther live per­for­mances or record­ings.

I’m in reg­u­lar tun­ing and us­ing a heavy pick for both these ex­am­ples. David uses both a pick and legato in his play­ing, in or­der to give each note a spe­cific voice and make each one ‘speak’. When play­ing these two so­los, you should fo­cus on string bend­ing ac­cu­racy, vi­brato, gen­eral tim­ing and feel. Take your time and, most im­por­tantly, have fun!

David Gil­mour with his fa­mous maple-necked black Strat

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