Black & Red

Luthier Joe Dob­son of Joseph Kaye gui­tars ex­plains the re­cre­ation Wilko’s fa­mous black-and-red 1962 Tele

Guitarist - - Interview -

“I’d started up my own gui­tar work­shop and I was do­ing mer­chan­dise for Wilko. He came up to me one day and said, ‘How much for a gui­tar?’ and we agreed a price, so he came into the work­shop and tried out a few things I had. His orig­i­nal ’62 Tele­caster has a big chunky neck with a wider nut and a two-piece di­ag­o­nal body join, which is re­ally rare. I made his gui­tar without see­ing it first and the strange thing was, I ac­tu­ally made a chunky neck with ex­actly the same width! But the weird­est thing was that I picked a two-piece body with a di­ag­o­nal join rather than a one-piece that I had! By de­fault, I man­aged to make him an iden­ti­cal gui­tar to his orig­i­nal without re­al­is­ing it. When he picked it up he in­stantly went, ‘This is the one!’”

Wilko’s num­ber one stage gui­tar: an orig­i­nal Fender Wilko John­son Tele­caster

3. Wilko’s Tele is in­stantly recog­nis­able with the sin­gle-ply red pick­guard on black fin­ish; the orig­i­nal gui­tar was re­sprayed to suit Wilko’s sig­na­ture ‘black-and-red’ look

3

1 1. Wilko’s Tele­caster has been round the block a few times – and a life on the road means pick­ing up that wellloved, road-worn look!

2 2. Wilko rarely de­vi­ates from the bridge pickup through­out his en­tire set, which suits his no-non­sense style of play­ing

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.