Win­ter well­ness

OK, IT’S BACK - WIN­TER HAS AR­RIVED! THIS WIN­TER, MAKE IT ALL ABOUT WELL­NESS AND MAIN­TAIN­ING GOOD HEALTH FOR THESE NEXT 12 WEEKS UN­TIL SPRING RE­TURNS. MAK­ING SOME SMALL AD­JUST­MENTS TO YOUR DAYS WILL HELP TO KEEP YOU ON TRACK TO AVOID COLDS AND FLUS AND THE

Haven Magazine - - Wellbeing -

The first is­sue we are go­ing to tackle is to keep mov­ing. Gym mem­ber­ships drop off, per­sonal training clients go into hi­ber­na­tion and there are not as many walk­ers out and about. The darker, colder morn­ings and early sun­sets def­i­nitely have that ef­fect, how­ever we still have 24 hours in a win­ter’s day so it is all about mak­ing some sim­ple changes. Keep­ing ex­er­cise gear at the end of the bed is a start. Be or­gan­ised the night be­fore – sleep in your work­out gear if you have to (I know many who do!) then there are no ex­cuses. Do a few laps around your block - whether you walk, run or cy­cle - just move. Aim for 20-30 min­utes to give the body time to warm up then lift the pace – see how many laps of the block you can do in 30 min­utes. In­stead of wait­ing on the side­lines at the kids’ sports training ses­sions, grab some other par­ents and walk while the kids train. You can stay close by, add some steps to the pe­dome­ter and keep warm too! Still aim for those 10,000 steps a day dur­ing win­ter.

KEEP HY­DRATED

Gen­er­ally over the cooler months we tend to for­get to drink suf­fi­cient wa­ter. Keep­ing hy­drated over win­ter is just as im­por­tant as any other sea­son. Our cells need wa­ter for us to func­tion cor­rectly so keep a full wa­ter bot­tle with you – drink wa­ter on ris­ing, around meal times and be­fore bed too. Make sure the kids are keep­ing hy­drated also as they will tend to have less vis­its to the wa­ter fountains at school dur­ing win­ter months.

The next im­por­tant mes­sage is to eat sea­son­ally. Na­ture has a fan­tas­tic way of pro­vid­ing us with the cor­rect nutri­ents that we need at the cor­rect times. Ev­ery­thing we need right now is grow­ing lo­cally. We don’t have to con­sume im­ported pro­duce that is not sea­sonal. Pro­duce that is cur­rently avail­able, but that should be out of sea­son has gen­er­ally be cold stored for long pe­ri­ods or im­ported (and cold stored dur­ing the im­por­ta­tion). They are also more ex­pen­sive (grapes are a fan­tas­tic ex­am­ple of a sum­mer fruit that is still avail­able). Hip­pocrates’ fa­mous state­ment “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” is tes­ta­ment to the power of eat­ing cor­rectly. And Hip­pocrates was not talk­ing about im­ported whole­foods. Look to nour­ish­ing whole­foods to sup­port your health this win­ter.

SLEEP WELL

Of course one other im­por­tant el­e­ment to win­ter well­ness is sleep. The qual­ity of our sleep is al­ways a big fac­tor in our over­all well­be­ing. In win­ter we tend to close all the win­dows to fresh air and bury our­selves un­der lots of cov­ers that causes us to over­heat. Sleep­ing in a bed that is over 32°C will have an ad­verse ef­fect on REM sleep and as such have us wak­ing feel­ing lethar­gic and vague. Al­low a flow of fresh air into your room and kick off some of those cov­ers.

KEEP UP THE VI­TA­MIN D

Warm up in the sun­shine. Don’t deny the body of es­sen­tial Vi­ta­min D from the sun’s rays this win­ter. We are so for­tu­nate to be in this part of the world where win­ter weather is still warm and we can still be out and about at the beach or the parks. Make sure you are still al­low­ing small amounts of ex­po­sure to the sun­shine to get this es­sen­tial vi­ta­min. The body ab­sorbs Vi­ta­min D from the sun quickly as op­posed to tak­ing a syn­thetic source of D vi­ta­min sup­ple­ments.

KEEP SKIN IN CHECK

Which leads me to the big fi­nale – skin. Our largest or­gan. It tends to get dry and flaky dur­ing the win­ter months. Our bodies are not sweat­ing as much and so we need to put the mois­ture back in. Be­fore you do, give your body a treat by dry brush­ing and re­mov­ing all the dead skin cells, fol­lowed by a shower and then nourish with mois­ture (I love my co­conut oil in win­ter). Dry brush­ing has many ben­e­fits as it stim­u­lates cir­cu­la­tion and the nerves un­der the skin in­clud­ing our lym­phatic sys­tem. This stim­u­la­tion then as­sists in rid­ding the body of tox­ins (and yes, cel­lulite too!) leav­ing the skin soft and ready to ab­sorb the mois­ture. Stay well this win­ter.

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