I’M REG­U­LARLY CON­TACTED BY ANX­IOUS MUMS OF KINDY OR PREP KIDS WHO “WON’T EAT AT SCHOOL”. SO I THOUGHT I WOULD SHARE SOME OF MY IDEAS FOR PRE­PAR­ING YOUR TOD­DLER TO BE ‘LUNCH­BOX READY’. THE DAY THEY START SCHOOL WILL COME AROUND BE­FORE YOU KNOW IT, SO HERE

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to un­der­stand that the in­dus­tri­al­i­sa­tion and com­mer­cial­i­sa­tion of our food chain has a with the peer pres­sure to con­form to the pro­cessed food norm, con­vinc­ing your kids such a shame that whole food lunch­boxes are One thing I’ve no­ticed from con­sult­ing with pa­tients and con­vers­ing on­line is that many kids who are gen­er­ally not too fussy, be­come fussy when it’s time for them to eat in­de­pen­dently (sur­rounded by class­room dis­trac­tions) from a pre­par­ing your tod­dler to be lunch­box ready, which will make your life im­mea­sur­ably eas­ier come time that they start kindy or school.

START NOW

If when you are out and you feed your go­ing to ex­pect their lunch­boxes to be full of when they start school. When my kids were lit­tle, in a con­tainer when we were out for the day, so the time came. When you are out and about, start pack­ing a small lunch­box of the sorts of things you want them to eat. De­cide on what style of lunch con­tain­ers suits best (lots of in­di­vid­ual con­tain­ers or a bento-style box) and if pos­si­ble al­low them start talk­ing to them about the or­der they should eat foods. I taught my kids from an early age that the cut-up fruit and cer­tain veg­eta­bles were best they ig­nored me and then found that say a piece of cut-up fruit wasn’t so ap­peal­ing when they went to eat it later in the day, I would again and learn!

GET THEM USED TO EAT­ING COLD LEFT­OVERS

One of the ways I make my lunches easy to make and re­ally nour­ish­ing is to work with left­overs ac­cess to fa­cil­i­ties to heat food, they will need to in win­ter to send some warm lunches, but mostly my kids eat ev­ery­thing cold. I don’t and never have mi­crowaved my kids’ foods, so un­less I had time when they were lit­tle to heat it on the stove­top or oven, they ate it cold and I now know, this has helped them to eat any­thing that school, just be­cause they aren’t used to raw or send­ing their kids with cold meat or left­overs, but trust me, this is way bet­ter than send­ing them which is re­ally im­por­tant nu­tri­tion­ally and also to keep them in­ter­ested in eat­ing well at school.

NO SUR­PRISES AND SET BOUND­ARIES

Food bound­aries and guide­lines are re­ally im­por­tant, even when it come to eat­ing from a on a week­end in­stead. I have set bound­aries, even when they were lit­tle, that I ex­pect them to eat what I pack. I don’t force them to eat some­thing that’s gone them used to eat­ing what you’ve packed, so you won’t be do­ing them or yourself any favours if you jump to get them some­thing else if they show dis­plea­sure as to what’s in them to eat any­thing, rather talk to them about what’s in their lunch as you pack it and cu­cum­ber to­day? My kids al­ways, even to this day, like to look at their lunch be­fore they put it in their bag.

OF­FER A VA­RI­ETY OF FOODS

My kids get re­ally bored if I feed them the same thing over and over again. Va­ri­ety in their lunch­box not only keeps them in­ter­ested, it also pos­si­ble. Feed­ing them the same things over and over re­ally lim­its their po­ten­tial to be truly be con­strained by fruit and a plain sand­wich.

GET THEM IN­VOLVED

Kids are al­ways more likely to eat what’s in their lunch­box if they’ve had some say or in­volve­ment in making it. Even if it’s as sim­ple as di­rect­ing lit­tle ones to pack the fruit from the chop­ping com­pli­cated. I hope this post gives you a few ideas to im­ple­ment be­fore school comes around for your tod­dler. It is al­ways best to pre­vent rather than ready to tackle this next phase of your child’s de­vel­op­ment.

Words: Ge­or­gia Hard­ing

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