5 FOOD TO EAT EV­ERY DAY

Healthy Food Guide (Australia) - - FEATURES -

PRUNES Why …

They con­tain nu­tri­ents that in­hibit bone re­sorp­tion — the break­down of bone min­er­als that con­trib­utes to os­teo­poro­sis.

When sci­en­tists in the US tested the prune the­ory on a group of post­menopausal women, they found those who ate 10 prunes a day had sig­nif­i­cantly higher bone min­eral den­sity af­ter 12 months.

Prunes are also known to work as a pre­bi­otic, en­cour­ag­ing the growth of ben­e­fi­cial gut bac­te­ria, which may help to pro­tect you against bowel cancer.

BRAZIL NUTS Why …

A 20g serve trig­gers an im­me­di­ate im­prove­ment in choles­terol lev­els that lasts for at least nine hours. They’re also a rich source of se­le­nium, a min­eral that may pro­vide some pro­tec­tion against bowel and prostate cancer. Just two Brazil nuts de­liv­ers your daily rec­om­mended se­le­nium in­take.

COOKED RED TO­MA­TOES Why …

Compared to raw to­ma­toes, cooked ones have up to 164 per cent more ly­copene, which pro­tects against heart dis­ease, cer­tain can­cers and even de­pres­sion in later life.

A UK study also found those who con­sume a daily dose of ly­copene have sig­nif­i­cantly higher lev­els of a mol­e­cule called pro­col­la­gen that helps pre­vent ageing in their skin.

LEAFY GREEN VE­G­IES Why …

Kale, broc­coli and spinach are rich in lutein and zeax­an­thin, nu­tri­ents that pro­tect against age-re­lated eye dis­eases.

Broc­coli also has sul­foraphane, a cancer-fight­ing com­pound that can slow down the de­struc­tion of joint car­ti­lage that con­trib­utes to the growth of os­teoarthri­tis.

LENTILS Why …

They have re­sis­tant starch, which your gut bac­te­ria fer­ment into short-chain fatty acids, in­clud­ing bu­tyrate, which pro­tects against bowel cancer.

Plus, if you swap the pota­toes or rice in a meal for lentils, your post-meal blood glu­cose lev­els will fall by 20 per cent. Over time, that can help lower your type 2 di­a­betes risk.

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