DRY AR­GU­MENT

Herald Sun - Motoring - - Prestige -

Keep­ing the en­gine breath­ing while the Range Rover wades at up to 900mm set an elab­o­rate chal­lenge for chief project engi­neer Alex Hes­lop and his team.

“The out­go­ing Range Rover was class-lead­ing at 750mm and its vents are on the side (of the body­work),” he says.

“This one breathes through the gap be­tween the head­lamp and the bon­net.

“The air is forced at dif­fer­ent speeds through a chan­nel be­tween the bon­net’s in­ner and outer pan­els, then goes into a cou­ple of fun­nels — we call them the Queen Marys — into the in­duc­tion chan­nel, then through noise re­duc­tion and wa­ter traps.”

The dry air joins the out­put from the in­ter­cool­ers ... but that in­volves yet another plumb­ing trick. Due mid-2014 EN­GINE 4.4-litre V8 twin turbo, 250kW/700Nm TRANS­MIS­SION 8-speed auto; 4WD THIRST 8.7L/100km, 229g/km CO2

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